Global Beat Australia: Tropical funk, sublime breakbeat, and serious ear candy

By Andrew Khedoori and Raul Campos

This week’s Global Beat features the Australian sounds of CLYPSO, upsidedownhead, and Logic1000. Photos by Imogen Grist, Alex Bennison and Kasia Zacharko.

KCRW’s Global Beat is a series highlighting emerging artists from around the world. We’re kicking the series off with our friends in Australia by partnering with The Australian Music Alliance and the Australian Music Radio Airplay Project (Amrap), a uniquely Australian organization designed to support Australian music on public radio.

Join host KCRW DJ Raul Campos along with Amrap Manager Andrew Khedoori for this week’s Aussie artist spotlights. We’re hopping around the country to check out the tropical funk of Avalanches collaborator CLYPSO, the expansive pop of upsidedownhead, and the sublime breakbeat of Logic1000. Catch up on all the artists from the series (plus bonus tracks!) with our Global Beat: Australia playlist



CLYPSO - “Less Talk” 


CLYPSO is a Sydney-based featured artist on The Avalanches' last record stepping out on her own with a tropical funk mover. Photo by Hana Schleisinger.

You may not have heard of CLYPSO before, but there is a really good chance that you've heard her music. She was one of the featured artists on The Avalanches’ last album "We Will Always Love You" from last year. Her vocals joined Neneh Cherry and Jamie XX on one of that album's early singles, "Wherever You Go." 

Her song "Less Talk” was knocked out during a free day that CLYPSO had while touring with The Avalanches last year. She got together with Ben from Australia’s Miami Horror, who also happened to be free at the same time and the same place, and this is the result. The track bumps in a way that matches its title. It's all about saving the chit chat and letting your wilder side out for the night, and having a great time doing it. It's a kind of funk mover with that feel-good analog fizziness to it. It's hard to stop it from melting your ears when it takes off. It's a little tropical, a little trippy, and a whole lot of cool. 



upsidedownhead feat. Clea - “Say Something” 


upsidedownhead, a.k.a. Ross James, features Brisbane's Clea for some serious ear candy. Photo by Alex Bennison. 

Australia’s upsidedownhead is the work of Ross James. He first started releasing music around 2018, and he's added some really nice production credits to his name since then, including Daniel Johns from Silverchair and Chet Faker. He's got a new EP on the way with a bunch of features. 

“Say Something” is off of that and features a Brisbane singer called Clea, who works more in the pure pop realm and makes a perfect match for upsidedownhead's production. She's got a warm, dreamy voice that glides over the top of what's a really expansive pop feel, and lush textures that just swirl around your ears. It's some serious ear candy.



Logic1000 - “Safe In My Arms


Originally from Sydney, Logic1000 delivers sublime breakbeat from her home in Berlin. Photo by Perfume.

Logic1000 is the alias of producer and DJ Samantha Poulter. She's from Sydney, but she's now based in Berlin, which is always the epicenter for this type of sound. She's really making a name for her mesmerizing work and has already been handpicked to do an Essential Mix for the BBC. A lot of dance producers at the moment are exploring atmosphere as much as rhythm these days. The resurgence of ambient music has played a big part in that. Her work can really tingle the brain cells, but also has this deep physicality to it. 

The balance is great, and it never tips one way or the other. The world has heard big productions with a lot of maturity and polish from Australia from the likes of Flume in recent years. And that shows the evolution of electronic and dance music from this country. Logic1000 is not working in the same way as Flume, who has essentially gone stadium in recent years, but is still thinking of a dance floor while wanting to be equally sublime in your headphones.

Playlist

[PLAYLIST GOES HERE]

Credits

Producers:

Raul Campos, Adam Burke