Bookworm

Bookworm

Intellectual, accessible, and provocative literary conversations.

Daniel Mendelsohn’s  Ecstasy and Terror: From the Greeks to Game of Thrones  is an uncommon collection of essays that intertwine the personal with the intellectual and critical.

Jonathan Blum wrote characters with open destinies, in stories with open endings, for his new book of short stories,  The Usual Uncertainties.

Ben Lerner’s  Leaving the Atocha Station  and  10:04  find their synthesis in  The Topeka School , the third in his Hegelian trilogy.

In André Aciman’s Find Me, strokes of luck are destiny.

Again Deborah Eisenberg demonstrates herself as a masterful and electric writer, in her new collection of seven stories,  Your Duck Is My Duck .

Adina Hoffman’s "Ben Hecht: Fighting Words, Moving Pictures" is about a man of multitudes.

Chris Ware’s  Rusty Brown  depicts life the way it is: jam packed with details, the closer you look the ever more there is.

And How Are You, Dr. Sacks?: A Biographical Memoir of Oliver Sacks  by Lawrence Weschler is a book that can only be itself.