All Things Considered (Weekend)

All Things Considered (Weekend)

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1 hr

National Public Radio's weekend afternoon newsmagazine.

Recent Stories

Sunday's anniversary of the day marchers were beaten by police in Selma, Ala., will honor the late civil rights icon. Some 56 years later, former state Sen. Hank Sanders says his work isn't done.

The song "Strange Fruit" is the powerful and thematically horrifying centerpiece of the new film <em>The United States Vs. Billie Holiday</em>, which positions music as a powerful force for change.

More than 250 people have been charged in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot. NPR is looking at the cases. Each provides clues to questions surrounding the attack: Who joined the mob? What did they do? And why?

U.N. Deputy High Commissioner for Refugees Kelly Clements says she's pleased the U.S. plans to raise the cap on refugees to 125,000 per year. Work is already underway at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Canada Post is distributing prepaid postcards to 13.5 million households in an effort to encourage people to connect with others through a handwritten note in its #WriteHereWriteNow campaign.

Movie theaters in New York City are reopening after nearly a year. And the decisions has consequences for the entire globaly output of Hollywood.

As the pace of vaccination picks up, so do reports of spoiled doses. In Tennessee, close to 5,000 doses have been lost, prompting more oversight from state and federal officials.

With new cases teetering at about 60,000 to 70,000 per day, new hyper-transmissible variants and state rollbacks of coronavirus restrictions, the CDC chief urges Americans to remain vigilant.

Last month, Jason Torlano and Zach Milligan skied and rappelled down Yosemite National Park's iconic Half Dome in a death-defying journey of nearly 5,000 feet from summit to valley floor.

"We want to demonstrate that although we're not a rich country, we can do something that is humanitarian ... but at the same time is an intelligent and sound migration policy," Iván Duque tells NPR.

President Biden vowed to govern as the most progressive chief executive since Franklin Roosevelt. But progressives in Congress are skeptical, especially after a recent letdown over the minimum wage.

In the wake of the historic 2020 election turnout, state legislatures across the U.S. are considering bills to make it harder to vote. Activist Stacey Abrams warns of a return to Jim Crow-era laws.

More from KCRW

Governor Gavin Newsom today signed a bill that sets aside nearly $7 billion for schools that reopen for in-person instruction by the end of March.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

If you're vaccinated, are you hugging loved ones again, starting to plan trips, feel less anxiety when entering grocery stores? Let us know.

from Greater LA

California’s vaccine rollout has been less than smooth.

from KCRW Features

The Latest

Josh Barro talks with Megan McArdle and Christine Emba about the decision to end mask mandates in certain states as vaccination continues, covid relief and stimulus payments, the…

Not now, but soon?

Josh Barro talks with Megan McArdle and Christine Emba about the decision to end mask mandates in certain states as vaccination continues, covid relief and stimulus payments, the…

from Left, Right & Center

With vaccines rolling out and business reopenings on the horizon, heads of movie studios are making it clear they have not given up on theaters.

Movie studios prepare for audiences to head back to theaters

With vaccines rolling out and business reopenings on the horizon, heads of movie studios are making it clear they have not given up on theaters.

from The Business

More than half a million Americans have died from COVID-19 since the pandemic took off here almost one year ago.

OSHA didn’t investigate many workplace safety complaints it received during pandemic, report finds

More than half a million Americans have died from COVID-19 since the pandemic took off here almost one year ago.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Governor Gavin Newsom today signed a bill that sets aside nearly $7 billion for schools that reopen for in-person instruction by the end of March.

When to reopen classrooms? Debate continues among school staff, parents, lawmakers

Governor Gavin Newsom today signed a bill that sets aside nearly $7 billion for schools that reopen for in-person instruction by the end of March.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

As of this week, teachers are eligible to be vaccinated. The state is setting aside 10% of its supply for teachers.

Reserving a portion of COVID vaccines for hard-hit communities, and promoting equity in public health

As of this week, teachers are eligible to be vaccinated. The state is setting aside 10% of its supply for teachers.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

With vaccines rolling out and business reopenings on the horizon, heads of movie studios are making it clear they have not given up on theaters.

Movie studios are anticipating a return to theaters

With vaccines rolling out and business reopenings on the horizon, heads of movie studios are making it clear they have not given up on theaters.

from Hollywood Breakdown

Before the pandemic, “dine-and-dash” was a phrase reserved for in-person dining. It meant running away before paying the bill.

People are dining and dashing with takeout. Restaurants are paying the price

Before the pandemic, “dine-and-dash” was a phrase reserved for in-person dining. It meant running away before paying the bill.

from Greater LA

Santa Barbara is the latest city in California to consider phasing out fossil fuels by requiring new construction to be all-electric.

No gas stoves or gas heat? Santa Barbara considers going all-electric in new construction

Santa Barbara is the latest city in California to consider phasing out fossil fuels by requiring new construction to be all-electric.

from Greater LA