Deepa Fernandes

Deepa Fernandes

Reporter

Producer

Deepa Fernandes, is an award-winning journalist who has reported from a dozen countries, from Peru to Cuba to East Timor. Fernandes has reported from inside rebel-controlled prisons during a Haitian coup, slum villages in Mumbai, and immigration jails across the U.S. Most recently Fernandes was the Early Childhood correspondent at Southern California Public Radio, KPCC. She won numerous awards for her reporting on children aged 0-5, including the L.A. Press Club's Radio Journalist of the Year for 2017 and 2018.

In 2012 she was a Knight Journalism fellow at Stanford University and she has an MA from Columbia University. She authored a book on immigration in 2007, Targeted, published by Seven Stories Press. In 2001, Fernandes founded People's Production House, aimed at diversifying the press corps and the range of voices heard in the media. Currently Fernandes is a correspondent at KCET's SoCal Connected, and files global stories for PRI's The World. Her work can also be heard on NPR, Marketplace, the BBC and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. She is married to multi-media journalist, Matt Rogers, and they are raising two spirited small children in Los Angeles.

Deepa Fernandes on KCRW

Parents have no clear guidance on when it’s appropriate to send their toddlers and babies to day care centers.

Is it safe for a baby or toddler to stay at day care centers during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Parents have no clear guidance on when it’s appropriate to send their toddlers and babies to day care centers.

from Greater LA

In June, Hossanna Pacheco graduated 5th grade over Zoom. Now the Pacoima tween is set to start middle school from a Chromebook on her living room couch.

Will Los Angeles schools serve English learners this year?

In June, Hossanna Pacheco graduated 5th grade over Zoom. Now the Pacoima tween is set to start middle school from a Chromebook on her living room couch.

from Greater LA

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many nature programs have shut down due to statewide budget shortfalls. Some Black and Latinx families lost access to nature.

Why some Black and Latinx families lose access to nature during pandemic

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many nature programs have shut down due to statewide budget shortfalls. Some Black and Latinx families lost access to nature.

from Greater LA

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