Elizabeth Loftus

Professor of psychology and social behavior at UC Irvine.

Guest

American cognitive psychologist and expert on human memory. She has conducted extensive research on the malleability of human memory. Loftus is best known for her ground-breaking work on the misinformation effect and eyewitness memory,and the creation and nature of false memories, including recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse. As well as her prolific work inside the laboratory, Loftus has been heavily involved in applying her research to legal settings; she has consulted or provided expert witness testimony for hundreds of cases. Loftus has been recognized throughout the world for her work, receiving numerous awards and honorary degrees. In 2002, Loftus was ranked 58th in the Review of General Psychology’s list of the 100 most influential psychological researchers of the 20th century, and was the highest ranked woman on the list.

Elizabeth Loftus on KCRW

How can we be sure things actually happened the way we remember them? For example, why do siblings remember the same past events differently?

How the malleability of memory impacts everything, from crime to families

How can we be sure things actually happened the way we remember them? For example, why do siblings remember the same past events differently?

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