Justin Gillis

New York Times

Guest

Correspondent who covers climate science and climate policy for the New York Times

Justin Gillis on KCRW

Climate change denial has been overtaken by observable facts — like the rapid melting of ice sheets that will increase ocean levels worldwide.

The Climate Is Changing while Politics Stays the Same

Climate change denial has been overtaken by observable facts — like the rapid melting of ice sheets that will increase ocean levels worldwide.

from To the Point

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