Kieran Setiya

Author; Professor of Philosophy, Department of Linguistics and Philosophy, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Kieran Setiya on KCRW

Philosopher Kieran Setiya shares the perplexities of the midlife malaise — including his own — and explores how philosophy provided him with answers.

A philosopher’s guide to the midlife malaise

Philosopher Kieran Setiya shares the perplexities of the midlife malaise — including his own — and explores how philosophy provided him with answers.

from Life Examined

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