Tracy Fox

Food, Nutrition and Policy Consultants

Guest

Registered dietician and nutrition policy consultant, based in Washington, DC

Tracy Fox on KCRW

The agriculture industry has made food so cheap and so plentiful that one third of Americans are obese and another third overweight.  Twenty six million people have Type 2 Diabetes,…

Can Government Control Obesity?

The agriculture industry has made food so cheap and so plentiful that one third of Americans are obese and another third overweight.  Twenty six million people have Type 2 Diabetes,…

from To the Point

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