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Maryland resident Bruce Cotting. Photo courtesy of Cotting. 

Born in Guam, living in Maryland -- U.S. passport denied 17 MIN, 8 SEC

The government says that between the 1950s and 1990s, midwives and doctors along the Texas-Mexico border were giving U.S. birth certificates to babies actually born in Mexico. Now that these babies are grown up, some of them are being flagged by the government and denied a passport, jailed, or denied re-entry to the U.S. if they’ve gone to Mexico. We speak with a lawyer who represents several people denied passports. We also hear from a man who was born in Guam -- but has lived in Maryland for more than 30 years -- who recently got his passport application denied.


Maryland resident Bruce Cotting. Photo courtesy of Cotting. 

Guests:
Jennifer Correro, immigration attorney in Houston
Bruce Cotting, residential realtor in Maryland

More:
U.S. is denying passports to Americans along the border, throwing their citizenship into question

The trolling of women political candidates 11 MIN, 24 SEC

There’s a record number of women running for political office this year. Leading into the primaries, there were 476 women in the races for the House of Representatives alone. But the bad news: many of them are facing harassment as they campaign. Sometimes it’s so severe that they drop out of the race.

Guests:
Maggie Astor, reporter, New York Times (@MaggieAstor)

What do you do with confederate monuments that are taken down? 11 MIN, 4 SEC

A statue of a confederate soldier was pulled down last week at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. The school has a few months to figure out what to do with Silent Sam, which stood on campus for more than 100 years. The situation is complicated by the fact that North Carolina has a law that limits how and when historical objects like statues are moved.

Guests:
Sarah Conley Odenkirk, Art Attorney

The California assembly allows bars to stay open until 4 am 6 MIN, 56 SEC

A bill to allow bars in nine California cities, including LA, to serve until 4 am is making its way through the state legislature. The Assembly has approved it. It goes to the Senate next, where it’s expected to be approved. Then it’ll go to Governor Jerry Brown’s desk, where he’s expected to sign it into law. Do bar owners and staff even want to stay open until 4 am?

Guests:
Dustin Lancaster, Owner and operator of almost a dozen bars

More:
Bill That Would Keep Bars In SF And Oakland Open Till 4AM Nears Final Approval

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