Breaking down big court battles over ballots in Texas, Pennsylvania and North Carolina

Pearl Wright and her granddaughter, Kayin Coward, 11, chant "count every vote" outside the federal courthouse in Houston, Texas, U.S., November 2, 2020, where a judge is deciding whether or not to throw out votes for the upcoming presidential election cast with drive-thru voting. Photo by Reuters

In Texas, a federal judge is hearing a case today involving drive-through polling centers in Harris County, which includes the city of Houston. On Sunday the State Supreme Court rejected a request by Republicans to hear this case. Nearly 130,000 people used these sites to vote early.

In a Supreme Court decision last week involving Pennsylvania, the court again said the state could accept ballots that come in three days after Election Day, as long as they were postmarked by November 3.

The high court said North Carolina could extend its deadline for mail-in ballots to nine days after the election. Three justices dissented.

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court will hear a big case on whether religious institutions that get state money to run foster care programs must work with same-sex couples.

Credits

Guest:
Jessica Levinson - Professor, LMU's Loyola Law School in Los Angeles - @LevinsonJessica

Host:
Madeleine Brand

Producers:
Sarah Sweeney, Michell Eloy, Amy Ta, Rosalie Atkinson, Brian Hardzinski, Angie Perrin