Misogyny in Islamic Countries and the US

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A Bangladeshi woman was hounded out of her country for comments about the Koran and women's rights. Now she's had death threats from Muslims in India. In Saudi Arabia, a rape victim's sentence of 200 lashes has inspired international outrage. After facing a barrage of questions at last week's Middle East peace conference in Annapolis, Saudi Foreign Minister, Prince Saud al-Faisal, promised the courts will review the sentence for the 20-year old woman who was raped—along with a male companion—by seven men. In the United States, women were not given the right to vote until 1920.  Current law allows a woman to be elected President, but Hillary Clinton is the first to have a real chance. Misogyny, however, is by no means dead, as demonstrated by many Facebook headlines about her candidacy. Moreover, when a woman supporter asked Senator John McCain, "How do we beat the bitch?," he famously did not rebuke her for using that term. Is misogyny enshrined in Islamic law? What about the United States? We look attitudes toward women in religion and culture.

Credits

Guests:
Farida Deif - Women's Rights Researcher, Human Rights Watch, Laleh Bakhtiar - In-House Scholar, Kazi Publications, Bernard Haykel - Professor of Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University, Jonathan Tilove - Washington Reporter, New Orleans Times-Picayune, Michael Kimmel - Professor of Sociology, State University of New York-Stony Brook

Host:
Warren Olney

Producers:
Frances Anderton, Karen Radziner, Sonya Geis