Warren Olney

Warren Olney

Host, To the Point, Which Way, L.A.?

Warren Olney is the host and executive producer of To the Point and To the Point’s Climate Change Update. They are podcasts based on 50 years of experience as a journalist in print, commercial TV and public broadcasting. He formerly hosted both the local focused Which Way, LA? and the nationally syndicated To the Point on 89.9 KCRW Santa Monica.

Olney and his programs have been honored with nearly 40 national, regional and local awards for broadcast excellence. In 2012, Olney received the 2012 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Radio and Television News Association of Southern California for his broad achievements in television news, as well as his storied career over 20 years on public radio, both locally and nationally. He has been awarded the Golden Mike Award for "Best Public Affairs Program," and WWLA was honored with the Los Angeles Press Club's Southern California Journalism Award for Best Talk/Public Affairs Show. Olney was named Best Radio Journalist of the Year at the 2001 Los Angeles Press Club's Southern California Journalism Awards.

WWLA was also named as Best Talk/Public Affairs Show during the same awards ceremony. He is the only person to have been twice named "Broadcast Journalist of the Year" — for his work in both radio and television — by the Society of Professional Journalists, Los Angeles. He is the recipient of Emmy Awards for reporting and anchoring, and Golden Mikes for investigative reporting.

Concurrent with his hosting duties on Which Way, LA?, from June 1999 to September 2000, he served as co-anchor of KCET-TV's Life & Times Tonight, a nightly public affairs show. Olney was a television news reporter and anchor from 1966 to 1991, working in Washington, DC, Sacramento, and Los Angeles. Throughout his career, he covered local, state, and national politics, including presidential primaries, nominating conventions and inaugurals, and superpower summit meetings in Washington and Geneva. His special projects and investigations have focused on crime, science, the environment, among other subjects. Overseas assignments took him to Europe, Asia, and Central America.

He also served as a print reporter for the Sacramento Bee (California) and the Newport News Daily Press (Virginia). Olney's interviews, book reviews, articles, and columns have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, the Village Voice, Los Angeles magazine, and California Journal, among other publications. He frequently speaks on politics, the media, the evolving character of Southern California, and other subjects, and is often called on to moderate public panels on numerous topics. At the University of Southern California, Olney developed and taught "Broadcast Journalism," a laboratory course for graduate and undergraduate students, from 1976-1982.

As an actor, Olney has appeared in numerous feature films, including Crimson Tide, The Fisher King, and Higher Learning, as well as other feature and television productions. Olney received his BA in English, magna cum laude, from Amherst College (Massachusetts) and became a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He has four children and five grandchildren. He is married to Marsha Temple, a former attorney at law, now Executive Director of the Integrated Recovery Network, a nonprofit helping the homeless mentally ill to find housing, treatment and jobs.

Warren Olney on KCRW

While Trump cuts environmental protections, Democrats debate climate change -- when reporters give them a chance. CNN didn’t ask until the second half of the latest debate.

The climate debate and impeachment

While Trump cuts environmental protections, Democrats debate climate change -- when reporters give them a chance. CNN didn’t ask until the second half of the latest debate.

from To the Point

President Trump and Iran’s Ayatollah brushed with armed conflict this week. Did it all begin with the U.S.

President Trump is trapped in history

President Trump and Iran’s Ayatollah brushed with armed conflict this week. Did it all begin with the U.S.

from To the Point

In 2008, the subprime mortgage crisis cost hundreds of thousands of American families their homes. A small group of predatory lenders ultimately made billions.

‘Homewreckers’: the demolition of the American dream

In 2008, the subprime mortgage crisis cost hundreds of thousands of American families their homes. A small group of predatory lenders ultimately made billions.

from To the Point

More from KCRW

Today the House Judiciary Committee heard from four legal experts on what constitutes an impeachable offense, and whether Trump’s actions related to Ukraine fit the mold.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Leafly’s California Bureau Chief David Downs lays out what we can expect from this year’s cannabis market.

from KCRW Features

The House Judiciary Committee is holding its first hearing in the impeachment inquiry today.

President Trump is the fourth U.S. president to face impeachment.

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

Tensions between the US and Iran continue to mount following last week’s U.S. airstrike that killed a top Iranian general. We hear reactions from Iranian Americans living in LA.

from Greater LA

The White House insider who blew the whistle on President Trump remains under federal protection.  But whistle-blowing is a dangerous game.

from To the Point

Texts, documents and a Ritz-Carlton Vienna notepad

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

In the first installment of a remarkable two-part interview, the two left-wing public intellectuals meet for the first time to discuss world politics.

from Scheer Intelligence

Several nations have played a role in the WikiLeaks publisher’s demise as corporate media stands idly by.

from Scheer Intelligence