Environment

PG&E is under fire for its management of last week's planned power outages that left about 800,000 customers in the dark. CEO Bill Johnson admits the company was ill-prepared for the operation.

from NPR

The head of Pacific Gas and Electric, Bill Johnson, recently admitted that his utility did a poor job of overseeing the scheduled blackouts in the Bay Area last week.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Last week, 94 mayors of big cities from around the world gathered in Copenhagen, Denmark to talk climate change.

Mayor Garcetti on the role of cities in tackling climate change

Last week, 94 mayors of big cities from around the world gathered in Copenhagen, Denmark to talk climate change.

from Greater LA

Scientists say climate change is an urgent problem that needs drastic action, but not everyone buys it.

Reframing climate change as a symptom of evolutionary success

Scientists say climate change is an urgent problem that needs drastic action, but not everyone buys it.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

When it comes to surviving the warming climate, scientists are finding that some plants and animals have an edge. The hope is that these "super adapters" can help preserve their species.

Trees that survived California drought may hold clue to climate resilience

When it comes to surviving the warming climate, scientists are finding that some plants and animals have an edge. The hope is that these "super adapters" can help preserve their species.

from NPR

Sources of so-called “forever chemicals” are all around us: non-stick frying pans, water-resistant clothing and carpeting, food packaging.

‘Forever chemicals’ discovered in California’s water supply

Sources of so-called “forever chemicals” are all around us: non-stick frying pans, water-resistant clothing and carpeting, food packaging.

from Greater LA

Chuck Tapia remembers the exact moment he told his wife it was time to pack their valuables in their cars and flee their home.

In Porter Ranch, residents return home after Saddleridge fire

Chuck Tapia remembers the exact moment he told his wife it was time to pack their valuables in their cars and flee their home.

from Greater LA

Due to Santa Ana winds, gusts in some parts of LA could top 60 mph. Power lines could fall down and set things on fire.

Utilities cut off power as a wildfire precaution

Due to Santa Ana winds, gusts in some parts of LA could top 60 mph. Power lines could fall down and set things on fire.

from Greater LA

Multiple fires are blazing across the state, including the Saddleridge fire that broke out on Thursday. It’s moving fast in the San Fernando Valley.

How evacuees are coping with the Saddleridge fire

Multiple fires are blazing across the state, including the Saddleridge fire that broke out on Thursday. It’s moving fast in the San Fernando Valley.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

We reported last week about what it’s like    to own an EV    and be a renter in Los Angeles. We got a lot of questions and comments.

EV charging in LA: Your questions answered

We reported last week about what it’s like to own an EV and be a renter in Los Angeles. We got a lot of questions and comments.

from Greater LA

More than 600,000 people in Northern California could find themselves without electricity starting Wednesday.

Utility companies might cut off your power this week due to winds and wildfire risks

More than 600,000 people in Northern California could find themselves without electricity starting Wednesday.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. 

This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. 

In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden.  

Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.”  She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” 

In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” 

“We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries.  So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.”

We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

Human activity: as damaging as an asteroid

66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

from To the Point

Butterfly Beach in Montecito is popular among beachgoers. But 30 years from now, there won’t be much of it left to enjoy.

Tropical fish, microplastics and disappearing beaches: Climate change along the Central Coast

Butterfly Beach in Montecito is popular among beachgoers. But 30 years from now, there won’t be much of it left to enjoy.

from KCRW Features

Electric cars: the future of transportation.

Navigating the complicated world of EV charging

Electric cars: the future of transportation.

from Greater LA

There are incentives and rebates for people to buy an electric vehicle, but Los Angeles doesn't currently have the infrastructure to make charging easy and accessible for everyone.

Is owning an electric car worth the money?

There are incentives and rebates for people to buy an electric vehicle, but Los Angeles doesn't currently have the infrastructure to make charging easy and accessible for everyone.

from Greater LA

Plants not only add color to your home, but they can improve your mental and physical health too.

How plants can transform people

Plants not only add color to your home, but they can improve your mental and physical health too.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The EPA sent a    letter    today to Governor Gavin Newsom, accusing California of failing to provide clean water.

Why the Trump administration is accusing California of polluting its water and air

The EPA sent a letter today to Governor Gavin Newsom, accusing California of failing to provide clean water.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Greta Thunberg inspired Fridays for Future--school strikes around the world.  Were the leaders of major polluters paying attention? Not according to what they told the United Nations.

The UN: Climate change and future generations

Greta Thunberg inspired Fridays for Future--school strikes around the world.  Were the leaders of major polluters paying attention? Not according to what they told the United Nations.

from To the Point

Rising sea levels are making visible impacts on Orange County.

OC Line: What are homeowners and businesses doing about rising sea levels?

Rising sea levels are making visible impacts on Orange County.

from Greater LA

An ongoing war between California and the Trump administration has covered many issues: immigration, the Census, and the environment.

Trump administration says it could withhold federal highway funds from California over pollution

An ongoing war between California and the Trump administration has covered many issues: immigration, the Census, and the environment.

from Greater LA