Bill Carter

author, 'The War for Late Night'

Guest

Writer for the New York Times and author of The War for Late Night: When Leno Went Early and Television Went Crazy

Bill Carter on KCRW

The attack in Orlando last weekend allowed late night TV hosts a chance to shape the conversation in a way rarely seen before.

When Late Night Hosts Respond to News

The attack in Orlando last weekend allowed late night TV hosts a chance to shape the conversation in a way rarely seen before.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Jay Leno says goodbye (again) to late-night television tonight. Does his departure -- and the arrival of Jimmy Fallon -- mark the end of an era, or the continuation of one?

Goodbye Leno

Jay Leno says goodbye (again) to late-night television tonight. Does his departure -- and the arrival of Jimmy Fallon -- mark the end of an era, or the continuation of one?

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Bill Carter: The War for Late Night

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