John Heitmann

University of Dayton, Ohio

Guest

Professor of History at the University of Dayton, Ohio, whose research focuses on science and technology, and the history of the automobile

John Heitmann on KCRW

For many years, General Motors knowingly installed ignition switches that failed to meet specifications in Chevy Cobalts and other small cars.

GM on the Hot Seat — All Over Again

For many years, General Motors knowingly installed ignition switches that failed to meet specifications in Chevy Cobalts and other small cars.

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