Justin Simien

Justin Simien

Host of "Don't @ Me," and writer, director, producer of “Dear White People."

Guest

Justin Simien is a writer, director, and producer of both television and film based in Los Angeles, California. In 2014 he wrote and directed his first feature film, the critically acclaimed Indie Dear White People, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. After being called “timely and important” by critics and audiences alike, the project won him the Special Jury Award for Breakthrough Talent and was picked up by Lionsgate/Roadside Attractions. 

After the theatrical release of Dear White People in the Fall of 2014, Simien was awarded Best First Screenplay and nominated for Best First Feature at the Independent Spirit Awards. The film also earned him a nomination for the Bingham Ray Breakthrough Director Award at that year’s Gotham Awards, along with a nomination for the Audience Award. Actress Tessa Thompson also garnered a Breakthrough Actor win at the Gotham Awards for her leading performance as the fearless and controversial Sam White. Simien was included in Variety’s “10 Directors to Watch” roundup for that year.

Simien adapted Dear White People into a series for streaming giant Netflix, which debut in 2017, with many of the original cast returning to continue the story. The show, which recently debuted its second season, remains at a coveted and rare 100% on Rotten Tomatoes for both the first & second seasons. Simien’s next project will be writing and directing his second feature length film entitled Bad Hair. Paralleling the rise of New Jack Swing in 1989, Bad Hair is a horror satire that follows an ambitious young woman who gets a weave in order to survive the image obsessed world of music television. Her professional success comes at a higher cost than anticipated, however, when she discovers her new hair may have a mind of its own…

Justin Simien on KCRW

This week, we’re taking one last look back at some of our favorite moments of the year that was.

Revisiting some recent favorites

This week, we’re taking one last look back at some of our favorite moments of the year that was.

from The Business

In the season finale of Don’t @ Me, Boots Riley shares his history, muses, and the long road to one of 2018’s finest films, Sorry to Bother You.

Sorry to Bother You

In the season finale of Don’t @ Me, Boots Riley shares his history, muses, and the long road to one of 2018’s finest films, Sorry to Bother You.

from Don't @ Me with Justin Simien

Justin talks about what it’s like to be a filmmaker   outside   of the traditional studio system with producers Alana Mayo from Michael B.

The Unicorns

Justin talks about what it’s like to be a filmmaker outside of the traditional studio system with producers Alana Mayo from Michael B.

from Don't @ Me with Justin Simien

More from KCRW

Edward Goldman talks about exhibitions full of challenges and surprises at Skirball Cultural Center and Vielmetter Los Angeles.

from Art Talk

A week after TV writer Liz Feldman lost a family member unexpectedly and found out her fertility treatment had failed again, she took a meeting with some producers, having been told…

from The Business

Writer-producer Simon Kinberg has worked on the X-Men movie franchise since 2006. ‘Dark Phoenix’ was his directorial debut.

from The Business

"The Fall Of the American Empire" is a French-Canadian crime caper about money--not just the small fortune involved in a heist, but the larger fortunes that sustain the world of…

from Film Reviews

Edward Goldman talks about mid-career solo exhibitions by two Los Angeles artists.

from Art Talk

"Men in Black: International" is an industrial product salvaged from the remnants of an exhausted franchise and aimed at a young audience that may not know or care what a joy the…

from Film Reviews

Jazz pianist Billy Tipton has been celebrated by some as a trans pioneer – but his story resists an easy telling.

from Lost Notes

Nearly three years ago, Fox sued Netflix over the poaching of executives who were under contract.

from Hollywood Breakdown

Should you have the right to hasten your own execution?

from Here Be Monsters