Nellie Bowles

covers tech and internet culture from San Francisco for The New York Times

Guest

Reporter for the New York Times.

Nellie Bowles on KCRW

In Silicon Valley, some of the world’s biggest startups are going public. Uber already went public last week. Lyft goes public on Thursday.

Can San Francisco handle more millionaires as several startups go public?

In Silicon Valley, some of the world’s biggest startups are going public. Uber already went public last week. Lyft goes public on Thursday.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Here’s a gift idea for that person on your list who has everything already: a personal pollution monitor. It tells you how good or bad the air quality is.

Silicon Valley takes personal health monitoring to the next level

Here’s a gift idea for that person on your list who has everything already: a personal pollution monitor. It tells you how good or bad the air quality is.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

LA Unified was going to spend more than $1 billion buying iPads for LA public schools.

Wealthy Silicon Valley parents reduce screen time for kids

LA Unified was going to spend more than $1 billion buying iPads for LA public schools.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

More from KCRW

Rock musician Cody Marks and her band have been playing at California prisons for more than a decade as part of the nonprofit Jail Guitar Doors, which offers music workshops as a form…

from Greater LA

66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

from To the Point

Restaurants across LA are accepting credit and debit cards only because cash can be a liability for businesses and consumers. However, 22% of U.S.

from Greater LA

For people experiencing homelessness, a gym membership can offer more than an opportunity to exercise.

from Greater LA

If you're living at home with your parents, we want to hear from you. What are your top reasons for doing it? How do your parents feel about it?

from Greater LA

Mountain lions now roam the hills surrounding Los Angeles.

from Greater LA

KCRW joins a group of forest firefighters who are working to prevent wildfires. We get a firsthand look at what firefighters do when a blaze breaks out near Tujunga.

from Greater LA

In Redding, California, firefighters are still battling the large Mountain Fire that broke out late Thursday morning.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Due to Santa Ana winds, gusts in some parts of LA could top 60 mph. Power lines could fall down and spark fires.

from Greater LA