Ottessa Moshfegh

author and novelist

Guest

Ottessa Moshfegh is an American author and novelist. Her novel Eileen was short-listed for the Man Booker Prize.

Ottessa Moshfegh on KCRW

“Death in her Hands” is Moshfegh’s third novel.

Ottessa Moshfegh’s new novel: Trying to solve a murder that may have never happened

“Death in her Hands” is Moshfegh’s third novel.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

In “My Year of Rest and Relaxation,” the main character is a young woman in Manhattan who wants to sleep as much as possible in one year.

In Ottessa Moshfegh's novel, a woman tries to sleep for a year to erase her past

In “My Year of Rest and Relaxation,” the main character is a young woman in Manhattan who wants to sleep as much as possible in one year.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

In the novel “My Year of Rest and Relaxation,” the main character is a young woman living in Manhattan. For one year, she wants to sleep as much as possible.

In Ottessa Moshfegh's new novel, a woman tries to sleep for a whole year to erase her past

In the novel “My Year of Rest and Relaxation,” the main character is a young woman living in Manhattan. For one year, she wants to sleep as much as possible.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

More from KCRW

Why does America’s baby formula shortage continue? Also, Norm Eisen’s new book traces corruption from the Trump White House to the rest of the country.

from To the Point

Natalia Molina tells the story of Nayarit, her grandmother’s Mexican restaurant, a space that became a cherished hub for immigrants and the LGBTQ community in Echo Park.

from Bookworm

LA Times columnist Patt Morrison is back with an updated version of her 2011 bestseller: “Río L.A.: Tales from the Los Angeles River.”

from Greater LA

Tao Lin’s ‘Leave Society,’ in which he grows his idea of himself in a book.

from Bookworm

Rita Dove’s new book of poetry, “Playlist for the Apocalypse,” goes in many different historical and personal directions.

from Bookworm

LA’s youth climate leaders keep up with their schoolwork as they lobby for climate legislation, rally a generation, and try to secure a liveable future.

from Greater LA

War has shaped societies and cultures, but in the face of evil, how do we make sense of the horror and injustice? Does human nature doom us to fight one another?

from Life Examined

Writer and lecturer Susan Cain explores the evolutionary reasons behind sadness in our lives and how accepting sorrow can lead to greater emotional resilience and creativity.

from Life Examined

Tom Bissell speaks about how and why people hurt each other in his new book “Creative Types: and Other Stories.”

from Bookworm