Paul Pillar

Georgetown University / Brookings Institution

Guest

Paul Pillar is a non-resident senior fellow and former Director of Graduate Studies at Georgetown University's Center for Security Studies, and a nonresident senior fellow in Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution. A 28-year veteran US intelligence officer, including as National Intelligence Officer for the Near East and South Asia at the CIA, he is the author of Intelligence and US Foreign Policy: Iraq, 9/11, and Misguided Reform.

Paul Pillar on KCRW

The last time Donald Trump had a full-fledged news conference, he urged Russia to find and reveal more of Hillary Clinton's emails. That was in July.

Will Donald Trump make peace with US intelligence?

The last time Donald Trump had a full-fledged news conference, he urged Russia to find and reveal more of Hillary Clinton's emails. That was in July.

from To the Point

“The US has begun to mobilize a broad coalition of allies behind potential American military action in Syria.”

The Return of the Jihadi and Rethinking Our Failed War on Terror

“The US has begun to mobilize a broad coalition of allies behind potential American military action in Syria.”

from To the Point

The Islamic State controls so much of Iraq and Syria it’s able to finance its self-styled “caliphate” by selling oil.

The Islamic State Has Oil and Momentum… How Far Will It Go?

The Islamic State controls so much of Iraq and Syria it’s able to finance its self-styled “caliphate” by selling oil.

from To the Point

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