Reihan Salam

National Review / The Atlantic

Guest

Executive editor of National Review and columnist for Atlantic; co-author of Grand New Party: How Republicans Can Win the Working Class and Save the American Dream; fellow at the New America Foundation and columnist at Forbes.com

Reihan Salam on KCRW

And a continuing government shutdown.

New year, new Congress

And a continuing government shutdown.

from Left, Right & Center

We have a result in all but one of last week's Senate races and, of course, we're waiting on Florida.

Why is it always Florida?

We have a result in all but one of last week's Senate races and, of course, we're waiting on Florida.

from Left, Right & Center

Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford bared their souls in a hearing that lasted almost all of Thursday.

Ford describes, Kavanaugh denies

Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford bared their souls in a hearing that lasted almost all of Thursday.

from Left, Right & Center

More from KCRW

Malcolm Gladwell’s latest book, “Talking to Strangers,” is out, while he’s hosting the podcast, “Revisionist History.”

from To the Point

66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

from To the Point

President Trump is holding a press conference at the United Nations General Assembly in New York. In a speech to the U.N.

from News Stories

Presidential campaigns aren’t just on TV anymore, they’re on countless digital platforms.

from To the Point

More adults are living with their parents now than they have in more than a century. It’s a third of all adults under 34. But in Los Angeles, it’s more than 40% .

from Greater LA

Gov. Gavin Newsom has approved more than 800 bills.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The goods movement is the backbone of Southern California’s Inland Empire. With the threat of automation looming, what’s going to happen to the people getting replaced by robots?

from Greater LA

Trump’s sometimes, maybe lawyer Rudy Giuliani clearly needs an attorney himself as the investigations involving the former New York City mayor mount.

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

Election officials in LA County want to make voting easier, more accessible, and more secure.

from KCRW Features