William Overholt

Director, RAND Center for Asia Pacific Policy

Guest

Director of the RAND Center for Asia Pacific Policy and author of the forthcoming Asia, America and the Transformation of Geopolitics

William Overholt on KCRW

As China strives to be an economic colossus, hundreds of thousands of people are dying prematurely from un-breathable air and contaminated water.

Explosive Growth in China Causes Explosive Pollution Problems

As China strives to be an economic colossus, hundreds of thousands of people are dying prematurely from un-breathable air and contaminated water.

from To the Point

More from KCRW

A last minute cease-fire in Syria; Mick Mulvaney confirms, then quickly denies a quid pro quo; and no one likes billionaires at the Democratic debate, not even the billionaire.

from Left, Right & Center

When Gavin Newsom signed AB387 into law today, he ended 16 years of unsuccessful attempts by daycare providers statewide to unionize.

from KCRW Features

President Trump is holding a press conference at the United Nations General Assembly in New York. In a speech to the U.N.

from News Stories

A bone-chilling documentary about Roy Cohn, Donald Trump’s mentor, reveals the all-American evil that brought us modern-day politics.

from Scheer Intelligence

Despite mounting evidence, Republicans in the House and the Senate are defending President Trump or keeping their heads down. Veteran GOP conservatives accuse them of sacrificing morality for short-term political gain. Meantime the Trump Administration calls the impeachment inquiry “unconstitutional,” while legal scholars point out that it’s part of Article II. And how did Ukraine, an obscure former Soviet republic, become so important? Money.

from To the Point

Students are cutting class, and workers are striking worldwide.   At the UN, governments will be held accountable for promises made in the Paris Accords.

from To the Point

Greta Thunberg inspired Fridays for Future--school strikes around the world.  Were the leaders of major polluters paying attention? Not according to what they told the United Nations.

from To the Point

In a Dallas courtroom on Wednesday, a former police officer was convicted of murder for killing her African American neighbor, then she got a hug from the victim’s brother and the…

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

from To the Point