Chip Cutter

Wall Street Journal

Guest

Workplace issues reporter for the Wall Street Journal.

Chip Cutter on KCRW

For many people in white or some blue collar jobs, work life has included a commute, a cubicle or desk, consistent hours, managers, and meetings.

The changing nature of work in a post pandemic world

For many people in white or some blue collar jobs, work life has included a commute, a cubicle or desk, consistent hours, managers, and meetings.

from Life Examined

Amazon says it’s going to spend $700 million to retrain a third of its U.S. workforce for new jobs, and in some cases, jobs that Amazon doesn't even offer.

Amazon to spend big money on voluntary workforce retraining

Amazon says it’s going to spend $700 million to retrain a third of its U.S. workforce for new jobs, and in some cases, jobs that Amazon doesn't even offer.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

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Chuck Schumer unveiled a draft bill that would remove the plant from the federal list of controlled substances and expunge some federal cannabis-related criminal records.

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Getting a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine usually means leaving the house, but not always.

from Greater LA

The UC Board of Regents approved increasing tuition and fees by 4.2% for new undergraduates starting fall 2022.

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WarnerMedia’s Christy Haubegger on not looking at inclusion as philanthropy.

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Steve Scalise, the second highest ranking Republican in the House, got vaccinated against COVID on Sunday.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

LA’s nightclubs are back, ushering in a “Roaring 20s” momentum.

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Government insurance is provided to people for medically necessary care. But, when care is not necessary should it still be provided as a benefit?

from Second Opinion

A federal judge has given final approval to the $73 million settlement of a class action lawsuit brought by more than 5,500 women against former UCLA gynecologist James Heaps.

from KCRW Features

With the Tokyo Olympics opening this Friday, about 60 new COVID-19 cases have been reported, including among U.S. athletes Kara Eaker, Coco Gauff, and Katie Lou Samuelson.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand