P.J. Crowley

George Washington University

Guest

P.J. Crowley is a professor of practice at George Washington University and a distinguished fellow at its Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication. He is the author of Red Line: American Foreign Policy in a Time of Fractured Politics and Failing States. From 2009-2011, Crowley served as assistant secretary of state for public affairs.

P.J. Crowley on KCRW

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un provides guidance with Ri Hong Sop (2nd L) and Hong Sung Mu (2nd R) on a nuclear weapons program in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean…

North Korea's game-changer nuclear test

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un provides guidance with Ri Hong Sop (2nd L) and Hong Sung Mu (2nd R) on a nuclear weapons program in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean…

from To the Point

Every administration is subject to leaks of information, but the Era of Donald Trump is setting some kind of record.

New life for an American institution: Leaking…

Every administration is subject to leaks of information, but the Era of Donald Trump is setting some kind of record.

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At dinner last night at Mar-a-Lago, President Trump told China's Xi Jinping that he'd ordered a Tomahawk missile strike against Syria. A bit later, Mr.

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At dinner last night at Mar-a-Lago, President Trump told China's Xi Jinping that he'd ordered a Tomahawk missile strike against Syria. A bit later, Mr.

from To the Point

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