Rebecca Mead

staff writer for the New Yorker

Guest

REBECCA MEAD is a staff writer for The New Yorker and the author of My Life in Middlemarch and One Perfect Day: The Selling of the American Wedding.  She lives in Brooklyn.

Rebecca Mead on KCRW

Imagine a theme park with no rides or games. Instead of imagining themselves as princesses or pirates, children pretend that they’re … adults.

Kidzania

Imagine a theme park with no rides or games. Instead of imagining themselves as princesses or pirates, children pretend that they’re … adults.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

More from KCRW

Americans see coronavirus in terms of politics more than public health. Blue states are enforcing “social distancing.” Red states are reluctant.

from To the Point

Former Los Angeles City Councilman Mitchell Englander has agreed to plead guilty to federal obstruction of justice.

from KCRW Features

LA Rabbi Steve Leder says there’s a lot of catastrophic (and thus unproductive) thinking among his congregants.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

As the first big wave of COVID-19 infections hit San Francisco and LA, some city dwellers want to ride out the pandemic in more rural environments.

from KCRW Features

This is Rob Long, and on today’s Martini Shot I coin a new word: concernvertisement, which describes those emails we’re all getting from anyone we’ve ever bought anything from.

from Martini Shot

Three members of an LA family came down with COVID-19 after a ski trip to Italy earlier this month. They tested positive for the disease at LAX on their return trip.

from KCRW Features

Undocumented housekeepers are losing work due to the coronavirus outbreak. They don’t qualify for unemployment income and may not be eligible for government bailout.

from KCRW Features

For one artist, digital adaptation is nothing new. A gallery opens a new show during shutdowns. An arts conference goes virtual.

"Crip Camp: A Disability Revolution," evokes the history of a camp for disabled kids that flourished in the Catskills in the 1960s and 1970s.

from Film Reviews