Saul Gonzalez

Saul Gonzalez

Guest/Host/Producer, There Goes the Neighborhood

Saul Gonzalez is the host of There Goes the Neighborhood: Los Angeles and a reporter at KCRW. Saul has reported on such issues as California's sexual predator policies, high speed rail, the debate over right to die laws, and the struggles of LA's street vendors. Prior to his work in radio, Saul was the Los Angeles producer for PBS NewsHour, a reporter for the weekly magazine series "Religion & Ethics Newsweekly," and a producer and reporter for a variety of series and news specials on Los Angeles PBS affiliate KCET. During his television career, Saul reported on human rights abuses in Central America, Europe's struggles to assimilate its growing Muslim populations, and military tensions on the Korean Peninsula. He has been honored with eight Emmys and 10 Golden Mikes. He's also received the Radio Journalist of the Year Award two years in a row from the Los Angeles Press Club.

Saul Gonzalez on KCRW

Locals identify Crenshaw Boulevard as the main artery of Black culture in Los Angeles, while the man it’s named for was white.

Crenshaw Boulevard: Efforts to rename it divided the community

Locals identify Crenshaw Boulevard as the main artery of Black culture in Los Angeles, while the man it’s named for was white.

from Greater LA

Community activists, entrepreneurs, and local politicians are keeping tabs on President Biden’s $2 trillion infrastructure spending plan that’s currently being debated on Capitol Hill.

What Biden’s infrastructure plan means for LA and Southern California

Community activists, entrepreneurs, and local politicians are keeping tabs on President Biden’s $2 trillion infrastructure spending plan that’s currently being debated on Capitol Hill.

from Greater LA

A statewide program called Project Homekey converts motels, hotels, or vacant apartment buildings into long-term supportive housing for people living on the streets.

Project Homekey: Can LA’s aging motels help solve the city’s homeless crisis?

A statewide program called Project Homekey converts motels, hotels, or vacant apartment buildings into long-term supportive housing for people living on the streets.

from Greater LA

More from KCRW

Crowns & Hops , based in Inglewood, will be LA’s first Black-owned brewery.

from Greater LA

Joe Mathews writes that the real problem of California’s high-speed rail project is management, not money.

from Zócalo's Connecting California

The Venice Family Clinic is slamming LA County Sheriff Alex Villanueva and others for their call to clear out unhoused people from Venice Beach boardwalk by July 4.

from KCRW Features

A new government effort aims to bolster what’s sometimes called the “missing middle” in California’s most expensive housing markets.

from Greater LA

Now that kids are back on campus, teachers are bringing lessons outside to keep them safe. The health benefits for students extend far beyond COVID safety.

from Greater LA

More people are experiencing homelessness in New York City than in all of LA County.

from Greater LA

Zocalo Public Square commentator Joe Mathews says that while much of California has prospered in recent decades, Los Angeles has floundered.

from Zócalo's Connecting California

Beloved LA video rental store “Vidiots” is reopening in Eagle Rock early next year.

from Greater LA

The city of LA is expected to shut down Echo Park Lake, put up a fence, and move out all the unhoused people living there this week.

from Greater LA