Saul Gonzalez

Saul Gonzalez

Guest/Host/Producer, There Goes the Neighborhood

Saul Gonzalez is co-host of “The California Report” from KQED. Previously he was a reporter for KCRW and host of There Goes the Neighborhood: Los Angeles. Saul has reported on such issues as California's sexual predator policies, high speed rail, the debate over right to die laws, and the struggles of LA's street vendors. Prior to his work in radio, Saul was the Los Angeles producer for PBS NewsHour, a reporter for the weekly magazine series "Religion & Ethics Newsweekly," and a producer and reporter for a variety of series and news specials on Los Angeles PBS affiliate KCET. During his television career, Saul reported on human rights abuses in Central America, Europe's struggles to assimilate its growing Muslim populations, and military tensions on the Korean Peninsula. He has been honored with eight Emmys and 10 Golden Mikes. He's also received the Radio Journalist of the Year Award two years in a row from the Los Angeles Press Club.

Saul Gonzalez on KCRW

The California Botanic Garden in Claremont has a Noah’s Ark of native plants. That’s where freezers preserve seeds from plants that might go extinct.

Seed bank saves California plants from extinction

The California Botanic Garden in Claremont has a Noah’s Ark of native plants. That’s where freezers preserve seeds from plants that might go extinct.

from Greater LA

Massive solar projects will help California reach renewable energy goals, but not without costs to fragile desert ecosystems.

What’s the environmental cost of solar projects on CA deserts?

Massive solar projects will help California reach renewable energy goals, but not without costs to fragile desert ecosystems.

from Greater LA

The opening of LA’s first new light-rail line in 10 years raises hopes for new investment – and fears of gentrification – in historically underserved South LA.

Will new K-Train drive up business, gentrification in South LA?

The opening of LA’s first new light-rail line in 10 years raises hopes for new investment – and fears of gentrification – in historically underserved South LA.

from Greater LA

More from KCRW

Political violence is up. But commentator Joe Mathews says elected officials are not just victims of angry constituents, but often perpetrators of poisonous politics themselves.

from Zócalo's Connecting California

Psychologist and author Dacher Keltner shares the science and mysteries surrounding awe, and suggests we make finding awe part of our daily lives.

from Life Examined

LA’s annual homeless count determines how resources get distributed to the region’s unhoused residents.

from Greater LA

California is susceptible to the earthquakes that recently devastated Turkey and Syria. Seismologist Lucy Jones gives tips on preparing.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Heavy rains bring destruction to SoCal, and thousands of residents in Santa Barbara County remain stranded. President Biden declared a state of emergency.

from Greater LA

Mayor Karen Bass’s “Inside Safe” initiative has brought more than 100 unhoused people into shelters. But how fast permanent housing will materialize?

from Greater LA

David Lynch Theater Presents: Weather Report for December 15, 2022.

David Lynch Theater Presents: Weather Report for December 16, 2022.

Lensa AI allows users to upload selfies and transforms them into fantastical portraits. Some women say it's returning sexualized versions of their photos.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand