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FROM THIS EPISODE

Gail Vance Civille and Judy Heylmun taste food professionally, while writer Helena Echlin answers life’s modern etiquette issues and Phoebe Damrosch shares four-star hospitality secrets. Founding editor and host Chris Kimball pans for the best cast iron skillets and Jonathan Gold discovers the spiciest Thai restaurant this year. Scientist Rebecca Goldburg farms organic seafood and aquaculture. Plus, Darren Butler teaches small-space gardening techniques and Laura Avery stops by the Santa Monica Farmers' Market to see what’s in season.

One Good Dish

David Tanis

Producers:
Bob Carlson
Jennifer Ferro
Thea Chaloner
Candace Moyer
Connie Alvarez
Holly Tarson

Guest Interview The Gold Standard: Jitlada 7 MIN

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Pulitzer Prize-winning critic and LA Weekly columnist Jonathan Gold discovers, Jitlada, the spiciest Thai restaurant this year. Jitlada has been around for ages and was known as the first "nice" Thai restaurant in Hollywood. A year ago, it was bought by a Southern Thailand family, now the menu reflects this type of cuisine. Southern Thai cooking is the hottest (spiciest) cooking in all of Thailand.  Curry is made with incredibly hot chiles. If you aren't afraid of spice, make sure to ask for it "Thai style."  The curries are "dry" meaning not quite as soupy as regular Thai curries.  A cool dish comes along with the curry that is iced cucumbers and cabbage. Wild tea leaf curry, tastes like spinach times ten and has bits of catfish and coconut too. They do a great Southern Thai rice salad -- fried rice with coconut, vegetables - sweet and mild. Don't miss the mussels steamed in a hot broth with lemon grass. Very spicy. Made with plump, fresh New Zealand green mussels.

Jitlada Thai Restaurant 
5233 1/2 W Sunset Blvd (between Normandie & Western)
Los Angeles, CA 90027
323-667-9809

Music break: Tickle It by Mocean Worker

Guest Interview Cast Iron Pans 7 MIN

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Chris Kimball, founding editor of Cook's Illustrated and host of America's Test Kitchen, pans for the best cast iron skillets. Over the past 30 years nonstick skillets have taken the place of cast iron in most homes. But with disturbing reports about the effects of nonstick coatings on the environment and our health, America's Test Kitchens decided to take another look at cast iron to see if it is worth bringing back into the kitchen.

Kimball highly recommends the following pre-seasoned cast iron pans:
    -- Lodge Logic 12-Inch Skillet - $26.95
    -- The Camp Chef SK-12 Cast Iron Skillet - $17.99

Kimball recommends the following cast iron pans:
    -- Lodge Pro-Logic 12-Inch Skillet - $29.95; pre-seasoned
    -- Le Creuset Round Skillet, 11-Inch - $ 109.95; enameled

Music break: Don'tCha Hear me Callin' to Ya by Junior Mance

Guest Interview The Market Report 7 MIN

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Laura Avery chats with Vicki Fan, chef-owner of Beacon, about cooking with silk squash (Chinese sing gua.) On October 8, Vicki will be opening a new grab-and-go, healthy food eatery, The Point, in Culver City.

Sing Gua Salad with Ginger, Garlic and Redwood Hill Feta Cheese
(From Kazuto Matsusaka and Vicki Fan of BEACON, an Asian Cafe)
4 small appetizers

1/2 Tablespoon minced garlic
1/2 Tablespoon minced ginger
1 Tablespoon canola oil
2 lbs Chinese Sing Gua (Chinese Okra, Silk Squash, Luffa)
4 oz Redwood Hill feta cheese
Salt and pepper
Pine nuts, optional

Peel hard edges of Sing Gua and discard. Cut into chunks or thick slices. In wok, heat canola oil over moderate heat. Add ginger and garlic, being careful not to burn garlic. Add Sing Gua and sautee until Sing Gua is soft. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Remove from heat. Place on plates and grate feta cheese over it. Garnish with toasted pine nuts.

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Laura also talks with Lompoc farmer Mario Trevino about tomatillos (small citrusy tomato-like fruits with a hard protective husk.) He shares a salsa verde recipe (boil tomatillos, and then fry them with onions, peppers and cilantro) and talks about the medicinal properties of the husk (he makes a medicinal tea out of the tomatillo husk to lower his blood sugar.) It tastes awful, but Mario says it's brought his blood sugar down significantly.

Tomatillo Husk Tea
10 tomatillo husks
1 zucchini
1 nopal cactus

Boil for an hour and a half. Let it sit overnight. Drink the following morning.

Music break: Disco Special by Discotheque

Guest Interview Table Manners 7 MIN

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Do you know the do's and don'ts of dining solo? What about whether it's okay to bring last night's fragrant leftovers for lunch at work? Chow Magazine Table Manners columnist Helena Echlin dishes advice for the modern soul and answers questions about contemporary etiquette.

Music break: Pianolo by Peréz Prado and His Orchestra

Guest Interview Aquaculture and Organic Seafood 7 MIN

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Environmental Defense senior scientist Rebecca Goldburg talks about organic seafood and aquaculture. Aquaculture is farming that takes places in water. More and more fish that you buy in the store is raised on a farm. But just because it's raised in a controlled environment, it doesn't mean it's organic. Goldburg discusses where we might be getting our fish in the future, and the impact that it may have on the fishing industry and our oceans.

Music break: El Mañana by Gorillaz

Guest Interview Taste Like a Pro 7 MIN

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Sensory Spectrum's Gail Vance Civille and Judy Heylmun taste food professionally. They teach courses called "Identifying the Flavor Spectrum" and "Psychophysical Principals and Sensory Evaluation."  Getting trained to be a professional taster is no small task. Sensory Spectrum uses the latest sensory research technology to provide education, scientific results and technical solutions to guide decision-makers in the fields of foods, beverages, oral health, personal care products, pharmaceuticals, fabrics, paper, household products, fragrances, and environmental odor control.

Music break: I Am the Walrus by Adam Rodgers and David Gilmore

Guest Interview Small-Space Gardening Techniques 7 MIN

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If you enjoy eating fresh food, how about growing your own food? Horticulturist Darren Butler teaches small-space gardening techniques through Eat Your Veggies. Butler is also a consulting arborist, ecological designer and landscape specialist.  He has taught Sustainable Landscape Design and is on the advisory committee for the Los Angeles County-UC Master Gardener program. Butler also teaches workshops on sustainable bio-intensive gardening, eco-friendly Southern California gardening and perma-culture.

Master Gardener Email Gardening Helpline:  mglosangeleshelpline@ucdavis.edu
Master Gardener Phone Gardening Helpline:  323-260-3238

You can even chat with the Master Gardeners in person at the Los Angeles County Fair this Saturday and Sunday. They'll be in the Flower and Garden building from 11am-9pm.

Guest Interview Four-Star Hospitality Secrets 7 MIN

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Four-star waiter and author Phoebe Damrosch shares four-star hospitality secrets. In her book, Service Included, Damrosch details her rigorous service staff training for New York's Per Se. It's all about finesse and making the guest comfortable. She also talks about the roles of being of service, subservient and providing hospitality, which are traditionally female qualities in our culture, until it comes to the four-star restaurant, where these roles are typically filled by men. Damrosch was one of only a couple female captains at Per Se.

Music break: Sweet Pie by RJD2

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