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FROM THIS EPISODE

Karl Rove, the President's top political strategist, will leave the White House at the end of this month. Some Democrats say Rove acted above the law. Some Republicans say he should have left before last November's elections. We talk with reporters who've tracked the relationship that helped shape six and a half years of American history. Also, the Red Cross report describing CIA treatment of detainees in the war on terror, with techniques learned from countries known to use torture. Did they work? Did they violate international law?


Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Vanessa Romo
Frances Anderton

Making News Top Strategist Karl Rove Announces His Resignation 22 MIN, 7 SEC

After 14 years as the President's top political advisor, Karl Rove announced his resignation today. The President's top political strategist will leave the White House at the end of this month. We talk with reporters who've tracked the relationship that helped shape six and a half years of American history. Some Democrats say Rove acted above the law. Some Republicans say he should have left before last November's elections.

Guests:
Peter Wallsten, Washington Post (@peterwallsten)
Carl Cannon, Real Clear Politics
David Corn, Mother Jones magazine (@DavidCornDC)
Grover Norquist, President, Americans for Tax Reform

Reporter's Notebook Detainees and the 2008 Presidential Race 7 MIN, 15 SEC

For years to come, it's likely the US will be hunting and capturing jihadists all over the world. Some will be too dangerous to release, but impossible to try as ordinary criminals.  President Bush and the current Congress are unlikely to workout a legal framework for dealing with them, which will leave that task to the next administration. Jonathan Rauch, senior writer for the National Journal, questioned all the announced presidential candidates to see if they had any plans.

Guests:
Jonathan Rauch, Brookings Institution (@BrookingsInst)

Main Topic America's Treatment of Suspects in the War on Terror 19 MIN, 39 SEC

At a news conference last week, President Bush was asked about an article in the New Yorker magazine. It details the CIA's so-called "enhanced interrogation" of terrorist suspects-- including Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the confessed mastermind of September 11. Bush responded, "Haven't seen it. We don't torture." But the article says "the Red Cross described the agency's detention and interrogation methods as tantamount to torture and declared that American officials responsible for the abusive treatment could have committed serious crimes." Whatever one calls it, is such treatment a violation of international law? Does it provide useful information?

Guests:
Jane Mayer, New Yorker
Steven Kleinman, Senior advisor to the Intelligence Science Board's study on educing information
Michael Scheuer, former Chief, CIA's Bin Laden Unit

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