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FROM THIS EPISODE

After the summit in Jordan, President Bush appears to reject James Baker's Iraq Study Group even before its recommendations get to the White House. Prime Minister al-Maliki may be losing control of his government. Who's running Iraq?  What should the US do? Plus, traces of radiation discovered in a dozen sites during the investigation into the death of the late Russian spy, Alexander Litvinenko, and does immigration cause violence and crime, or make cities safer?

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Christian Bordal
Dan Konecky

Reporter's Notebook Does High Immigration Equal Low Crime Rates? 7 MIN, 27 SEC

In the year 2000, a national survey showed that 73 percent of Americans thought immigration is "somewhat or very" likely to increase crime. Next Sunday's New York Times Magazine asks whether that's that really true and details some surprising new research.

Guests:
Eyal Press, Writer, based in New York City

Main Topic After the Bush-Maliki Iraq Summit, is Anyone in Control? 35 MIN, 42 SEC

Today's New York Times quotes sources it says were part of the Iraq Study Group's deliberations on what to do next in Iraq. The bipartisan group will report its unanimous conclusions to President Bush next week. The Times says it will call for aggressive regional diplomacy, including direct talks with Syria and Iran. Rather than set a timetable for withdrawal of American troops, it will call for a gradual pullback.  After his meeting today with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, the President seemed to reject a "graceful withdrawal" in advance. Meantime, al-Maliki faces the breakup of his political coalition. Former allies say they won't return to the government until he sets a firm date for US withdrawal. Is Maliki still running the country, or is anti-American Muqtada al-Sadr taking control? What should the US do?

Guests:
Victor Davis Hanson, Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution
David Rothkopf, The FP Group (@djrothkopf)
John Burns, New York Times
Mustafa Alani, Director of Security and Terrorism Studies, Gulf Research Center

Making News More Radiation Discovered in Russian Spy-Poisoning Case 5 MIN, 53 SEC

Since a former Russian spy died from radioactive poison in London, investigators have found contamination in 12 places, and it's likely there will be more.  That's from Home Secretary John Reid today.

Guests:
Cahil Milmo, Reporter for the Independent of London

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