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FROM THIS EPISODE

Has the Transportation Security Administration gone too far?  Is the real key to security the intelligence gathered before anyone gets to the airport? President Obama claims that the START treaty with Russia is "a national imperative".  Also, a surprising verdict in a terrorist trial.

 

IMAGE: A passenger passes, on February 22, 2010, through a new body scanner introduced today for experimentation at Paris' Charles de Gaule international airport in Roissy, before departing to the United States. The controversial scanner is capable of peering through clothes to create three-dimensional images of passengers to reveal any concealed weapons or explosives. The decision follows 'guidelines proposed by a working group' looking into security measures and the evaluation and confirmation by an independent body that the scanners would have 'no impact on passenger health,' France's civil aviation authority said. AFP PHOTO / BERTRAND LANGLOIS (Photo credit should read BERTRAND LANGLOIS/AFP/Getty Images)

Producers:
Christian Bordal
Katie Cooper
Karen Radziner

Reporter's Notebook The Verdict Is in on First Guantanamo Civilian Trail 6 MIN, 33 SEC

Ahmed Khalfan Ghailiani was captured in Pakistan, held for five years at a CIA “black site,” then moved to Guantanamo Bay. Today’s verdict is sure to fuel the debate over civilian courts and military tribunals as the appropriate venues for terrorist trials.

Guests:
David Glazier, Professor of Law, Loyola Law School

Making News Obama Urges Presses for Passage of START Treaty 7 MIN, 46 SEC

President Obama today surrounded himself with former secretaries of state and defense of both political parties—all backing his claim that the START treaty with Russia is “a national imperative” that must be ratified by the Senate as soon as possible

Guests:
Jonathan Broder, CQ Roll Call

Main Topic Aviation Security: Must TSA Touch My Junk to Keep Me Safe? 37 MIN, 9 SEC

New threats to air travel have produced new strategies and technologies against explosives in shoes and carry-on liquids--even in underwear. But some passengers resent the new body-scanners in 68 American airports, and the pat-down hand search is also provoking a backlash. It’s invasive; it’s embarrassing Does it violate the 4th Amendment? Will it really work? Has the Transportation Security Administration gone too far? Is the real key to security the intelligence gathered before anyone gets to the airport?

Guests:
Kate Hanni, Founder, FlyersRights.org
Brian Jenkins, RAND Corporation (@BrianMJenkins)
Bruce Schneier, security technologist and author (@schneierblog)
Amitai Etzioni, Professor of International Relations, George Washington University

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