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FROM THIS EPISODE

As 190 nations meet in Bali to start the next treaty against global warming, Al Gore receives the Nobel Peace Prize and warns about "mutually assured destruction." We hear about the global marketplace that's developing to cope with climate change.  Also, the Supreme Court affords judges discretion when sentencing crack offenders, and a conversation with Oslo Norway, where Al Gore has accepted the Nobel Peace Prize.

Producers:
Christian Bordal
Katie Cooper
Sonya Geis

Making News Supreme Court Gives Judges Discretion for Crack Cocaine Sentences 6 MIN, 16 SEC

During the crack scare of the 1980's, Congress enacted harsher treatment for crack than for powder cocaine.  Today, the US Supreme Court ruled that federal judges may use discretion in imposing prison terms for crack offenders.  David Savage covers the court for the Los Angeles Times.

Guests:
David Savage, Los Angeles Times (@latimes)

Reporter's Notebook Al Gore Receives Nobel Prize in Oslo 5 MIN, 48 SEC

Al Gore received the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize today, with another warning to nations around the world. He said, "It's time to make peace with the planet" with "the urgency and resolve previously seen only when nations mobilized for war." We talk with Davis Guggenheim, the producer of An Inconvenient Truth, who's in Oslo, Norway for the prize presentation.

Guests:
Davis Guggenheim, Director and Co-Writer, 'Waiting for Superman'

Main Topic Climate Change: International Challenge and Business Opportunity 36 MIN, 51 SEC

Receiving the Nobel Prize today, Al Gore warned that failure to act against global warming will mean "mutually assured destruction." He had strong words for the US and China, two of the 190 nations meeting in Bali to hash out guidelines for a new treaty for reducing greenhouse gases. With a turnabout by Australia's newly elected prime minister, the United States is the only industrialized nation opposed to setting mandatory reductions of greenhouse gases. The Bush Administration backs private sector initiatives for energy savings and alternative energy sources. In Los Angeles, there's a meeting of entrepreneurs, manufacturers and investors who see climate change not just as a challenge, but an opportunity. What are they doing to reverse climate change and cope with a process that's already well under way?  Can LA and other cities cash in on a new international industry created by global warming?

Guests:
Robyn Beavers, Chief Sustainability Officer, Google
Claire Bonham-Carter, Director of Sustainable Development, DMHM H&N and EDAW
Tom Unterman, Co-Founder, US Renewables Grup
Tadashi Maeda, Director General of Japan Bank of International Cooperation's Energy & Natural Resources Finance
Earl Blumenauer, Congressman (D-OR) (@repblumenauer)

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