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Photo: Colombia's President Juan Manuel Santos (L) and Colombian First Lady Maria Clemencia de Santos arrives at congress to present the FARC peace accord to the Colombian Congress in Bogota, Colombia, August 25, 2016. (John Vizcaino/Reuters)

Producers:
Paul von Zielbauer
Jenny Hamel
Katie Cooper

Samsung recalls 2.5 million phones because of battery fires 6 MIN, 32 SEC

The Galaxy Note 7 smartphone got rave reviews when it debuted in August as Samsung's answer to Apple's latest iPhone. Now, Samsung's being forced to do damage-control. It's recalling 2.5 million Galaxy Note 7s because of batteries that have caught fire or exploded. Ian Sherr, Executive Editor at CNET, says the magnitude of the recall shows how seriously Samsung is taking the issue.

Guests:
Ian Sherr, CNET News (@iansherr)

After Decades of war in Colombia, peace has a chance 33 MIN, 35 SEC

In 1964, Colombian peasant farmers—virtual slaves of urban landowners--formed the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known as the FARC. Since then, 200,000 people have died and millions have been displaced in the Western Hemisphere's longest-running conflict. Now, there's a peace deal — if Colombia's voters approve it next month. But both sides -- peasant farmers and Marxist rebels against urban landowners using death squads and right-wing paramilitaries -- have committed atrocities over the years. Can victims and perpetrators learn to live side by side?  We look at the history, the hopes and the fears of a beleaguered nation.

Guests:
Adam Isacson, Washington Office on Latin America (@adam_wola)
Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times (@chriskraul)
Mary Anastasia O'Grady, Wall Street Journal (@MaryAnastasiaOG)
César Rodríguez Garavito, DeJusticia (@Dejusticia_En)

More:
Kraul on Colombia's war with the FARC
Kraul on the Colombia-FARC peace accord
WOLA on Colombia-FARC final agreement, remaining steps
Isacson explains Colombia's peace plebiscite

Could Russia cause chaos on Election Day? 9 MIN, 57 SEC

In politics, the worst fear is that voting results can be manipulated by outside sources. Could Russian hackers play a role in November's elections? The answer is "Yes."


Photo by kafka4prez

"If it's a computer, it can be hacked." That's according to Richard Clarke, who was cyber-security policy advisor to Presidents Clinton, Bush and Obama. Democratic Congressman Adam Schiff from Los Angeles is ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee. He has more on what's possible — and what's not — on Election Day in November.

Guests:
Adam Schiff, US Congress (D-CA) (@RepAdamSchiff)

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