ON AIR STAR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

SUPPORT KCRW!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

Mitt Romney is two for two leading into South Carolina, where Gingrich, Perry, Santorum and Paul are ready to give him trouble. But Republican power brokers and fundraisers are beginning to talk Party Unity. Also, Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour pardons almost 200, and the President pushes for "in-sourcing."

Banner image: Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney (C) speaks during his primary night rally with members of his family following the 'first in the nation' primary at Southern New Hampshire University January 10, 2012 in Manchester, New Hampshire. Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images

Producers:
Christian Bordal
Caitlin Shamberg
Karen Radziner

Making News Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour Pardons almost 200 7 MIN, 21 SEC

Mississippi's outgoing Republican Governor Haley Barbour has shocked his state and many others by giving unconditional pardons to 199 criminals, including drug dealers, rapists and four convicted killers. Daniel Cherry reports for Mississippi Public Broadcasting.

Guests:
Daniel Cherry, Mississippi Public Broadcasting (@dmcherry)

Reporter's Notebook 'Insourcing' Jobs back to America 7 MIN, 21 SEC

"Insourcing" may be an unfamiliar term, but it's the opposite of outsourcing, which means American companies moving jobs overseas. At the White House today, the President hosted a forum on how to keep them at home. He highlighted the "hopeful trend" of companies "choosing to invest in the one country with the most productive workers, the best universities, and the most creative and innovative entrepreneurs in the world." One of those companies is Master Lock, headquartered in Wisconsin. John Schmid is economics writer for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Guests:
John Schmid, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Main Topic Next Up: South Carolina 35 MIN, 56 SEC

New Hampshire Republicans had just 12 delegates to give in yesterday's primary. Mitt Romney, who got seven, clobbered Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum, who were shut out. Ron Paul and Jon Huntsman split the remaining five, and Rick Perry wasn't even campaigning. South Carolina could be a very different story, with allegations of closet liberalism, attacks on Bain Capital and Perry as part of the mix. But the anti-Romney forces are deeply divided, and GOP stalwarts — fundraisers and even Rush Limbaugh — don't like what sounds like anti-business rhetoric. Can Perry, Santorum, Gringrich or Paul become the anti-Romney conservative they think Republicans are looking for?

Guests:
Jonathan Martin, New York Times (@jmartpolitico)
Carroll Doherty, Pew Research Center for the People and the Press (@CarrollDoherty)
J. David Woodard, Clemson University (@ClemsonNews)
Adam Smith, Tampa Bay Times (@adamsmithtimes)

Events

View All Events

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER