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FROM THIS EPISODE

President Obama addressed the UN General Assembly today, promising the US will stay engaged in the Middle East for the rest of his term.  Also, the President's EPA has proposed rules for new power plants that are just the first battle in what’s shaping up as "a war on coal." We hear about domestic and international politics and new findings about global warming.

Banner image: President Barack Obama delivers remarks during his address to the United Nations General Assembly in New York, September 23, 2013. Official White House Photo by Amanda Lucidon

Producers:
Evan George
Kerry Cavanaugh
Christian Bordal

Making News Obama at the UN: Conflict or Compromise? 23 MIN, 52 SEC

President Obama addressed the UN General Assembly today, promising the US will stay engaged in the Middle East for the rest of his term.  He said there must be "consequences" if Syria fails to give up its chemical weapons. With regard to Iran and its new President, Hassan Rouhani, he said, "diplomacy must be tested," and that agreement on Iran's nuclear program could produce a new and different relationship. He said the two countries have been isolated from each other since the Islamic revolution, and that the mistrust has deep roots, but allowed that there could be an opening. How does that sound to Israel? We hear conflicting reactions.

 

Guests:
Scott Wilson, Washington Post (@PostScottWilson)
Jodi Rudoren, New York Times (@rudoren)
Robin Wright, US Institute of Peace (@wrightr)
Fouad Ajami, Stanford University

Main Topic Climate Change and the 'War on Coal' 27 MIN, 20 SEC

Power plants are by far the largest emitters of greenhouse gases in the US, and now the Obama EPA has issued regulations that Democrats in some regions are calling the first battle in a "war against coal." It could be extended and bitter. The President wants to get around Congress, with other countries looking for US leadership in reducing greenhouse emissions. We hear about national and international politics as climate scientists are about to release their latest findings.  

Guests:
David Biello, Scientific American magazine (@dbiello)
Andrew Restuccia, Politico (@AndrewRestuccia)
Jonathan Miller, RecoveringPolitician.com
Stuart Eizenstat, Covington & Burling

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