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FROM THIS EPISODE

Hackers have broken into major news organizations, and last week a false message on the Associated Press Twitter account roiled the financial markets. In Washington, the heat is on for new cybersecurity laws. Can Internet users be protected without violations of privacy? Do they first need to protect themselves with skepticism about the accuracy of "instant news?" Also, Syria's Prime Minister survives an assassination attempt, and for the first time, an active male professional athlete comes out of the closet.

Banner image: University of Maryland

Producers:
Evan George
Katie Cooper
Anna Scott

Reporter's Notebook NBA's Jason Collins Comes Out as Gay 8 MIN, 47 SEC

Jason Collins is a 12-year veteran of the NBA. This season he played with the Washington Wizards. In this week's issue of Sports Illustrated, he's become the first active, male professional athlete to reveal that he's gay. "I'm a 34-year old NBA center. I'm black. And I'm gay." Last week, in that same magazine, 'Point After' columnist Phil Taylor wrote under the headline, "A Storm that May Not Come."

Guests:
Phil Taylor, Sports Illustrated (@SI_PhilTaylor)

Making News Syrian Prime Minister Survives Assassination Attempt 7 MIN, 36 SEC

The Syrian state media report that Prime Minister Wael al-Halqi has survived a bomb attack against his convoy in the capital of Damascus. There are unconfirmed reports that his bodyguard and others were killed by what is said to have been a car bomb. Patrick McDonnell is in Beirut, Lebanon for the Los Angeles Times.

Guests:
Patrick McDonnell, Los Angeles Times (@mcdneville)

Main Topic News Media Hacking and the Case for Cybersecurity 34 MIN, 44 SEC

When the Associated Press falsely tweeted that bombs at the White House had injured President Obama, Wall Street indexes lost billions in value. NPR, the BBC, 60 Minutes and Reuters have also been hacked, and the best advice for Internet users may be don't believe anything the first time you read it. In Washington, the pressure's increasing for cybersecurity laws. Should AT&T and other providers share information with government agencies? Would that pose a risk to personal privacy, if there's any privacy left?

Guests:
Alina Selyukh, Reuters (@alinaselyukh)
Dan Gillmor, Arizona State University (@dangillmor)
James Lewis, Center for Strategic and International Studies (@james_a_lewis)
Amie Stepanovich, Access (@astepanovich)

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