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Syria's fragile ceasefire 6 MIN, 28 SEC

In Geneva today, Secretary of State John Kerry discussed the latest agreement with Russia for a ceasefire in Syria. "There are consequences to bad behavior here. In addition, if the Assad regime later on decides to break this, then that's our last shot. There will be, you know, other alternatives available to other countries and ourselves and those will have to be determined in the future."

Liz Sly is monitoring the action from Beirut, Lebanon for the Washington Post.

Guests:
Liz Sly, Washington Post (@lizsly)

Can politics cure the high cost of drugs? 32 MIN, 20 SEC

EpiPens are the poster child for vast increases in the price of familiar medications. Many people carry them for emergency treatment of allergic reactions that can be life threatening. So, when the Mylan Company raised the price of two EpiPens from $100 $614 it made big news. Turns out, it's the tip of the iceberg. Drug prices are on the rise and desperately ill people are often those hit by bills they never expected. Other countries have established price controls for life-or-death medications, but America's system is so complex it defies understanding. Drug and insurance companies, hospitals and doctors engage in secret negotiations, while various middlemen get cuts of the action. And, who's paying for those expensive ads on TV? Patients. Are the presidential campaigns offering any realistic solutions?

Guests:
Katie Thomas, New York Times (@katie_thomas)
Erin Fox, University of Utah Health Care (@foxerinr)
Thomas Stossel, Brigham and Women's Hospital (@tstossel4)
Timothy McBride, Washington University (@mcbridetd)

More:
Thomas on the complex math behind spiraling prescription drug prices

Pharmaphobia

Thomas P. Stossel

Muslim Marine recruit commits suicide during training 11 MIN, 3 SEC

The Marine Corps is conducting no less than three investigations of hazing, physical abuse, assault and failure of supervision at Parris Island — all in the aftermath of a suicide. The recruit involved was Raheel Siddiqui, a Muslim and a high-school valedictorian, who was recruited on his college campus. We hear more about the investigation from Gordon Lubold, who is one of those reporting the story for the Wall Street Journal.

Guests:
Gordon Lubold, Wall Street Journal (@glubold)
Debbie Dingell, US House of Representatives (@repdebdingell)

More:
Congresswoman Dingell on the Marine Corps investigation into Siddiqui's death

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