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FROM THIS EPISODE

The key to the American dream has been your own key to a home in the suburbs, with a car in the driveway and a back yard. Now, fewer people have or want that dream. Guest host Madeleine Brand looks at what's driving people out of the suburbs. Also, President Obama cancels his meeting with Russian President Putin, and how a persistent drought is permanently changing the landscape in the West.

Banner image: Suburban middle class neighborhood in Layton, Utah. Photo: D Sharon Pruitt

Producers:
Caitlin Shamberg
Christian Bordal
Sonata Lee Narcisse

Making News President Obama Cancels Meeting with Putin 7 MIN, 49 SEC

President Obama cancelled a planned meeting in Moscow with Russian President Vladmir Putin today. This follows Russia's decision to grant temporary asylum to NSA leaker Edward Snowden, after he spent nearly a month in diplomatic limbo in Russia's airport. President Obama addressed US-Russian relations last night on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. Andrew Kramer is in the New York Times' Moscow Bureau.

Guests:
Andrew Kramer, New York Times (@AndrewKramerNYT)

Main Topic The Decline of Suburbia 36 MIN, 54 SEC

For more than 50 years, Americans were drawn to the suburbs, with their sylvan promises of easy living. Owning your own home with a car in the driveway and piece of lawn was seen as central to the American dream. But the latest census numbers show a reverse migration into the cities. Real estate is more valuable there, and even big box retailers are setting up shop downtown. Is this just a Sex and the City trend or is it really goodbye for good to Ozzie and Harriet?

Guests:
Leigh Gallagher, author (@leighgallagher)
Sam Staley, Florida State University (@samrstaley)
Elizabeth Kneebone, Brookings Institute (@ekneebone)
Kathy Knapp, University of Connecticut

The End of the Suburbs

Leigh Gallagher

Today's Talking Point Western States in Drought, New Mexico Is Worst 6 MIN, 19 SEC

Nevada, Colorado, Wyoming- all are experiencing drought, but New Mexico has been hit the hardest. The last three years have been the driest and warmest on record. New Mexico's water storage in reservoirs is just 17 percent of normal levels, and some people have to live on trucked-in water. Julie Cart, Pulitzer Prize-winning environmental reporter for the Los Angeles Times, explains how drought in New Mexico, Colorado, Montana and elsewhere is changing the landscape.

Guests:
Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times (@julie_cart)

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