Brendan Borrell

writer

Guest

I've tracked down the maple syrup thieves in Quebec, unearthed the truth behind an 840-pound emerald from Brazil, and narrowly escaped from the world's deadliest bird in Australia.

My work has been published in Scientific American, Smithsonian, Slate, Bloomberg Businessweek and The New York Times. For a couple years, I was a correspondent for The Scientist, and I've worked as a staff reporter for Nature, Scientific American, and theOregonian. In 2013, I was an Alicia Patterson Foundation fellow and traveled to Uganda to investigate an herbal cure for malaria and the strange plague wrought by false tooth disease. My international reporting has also been funded by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, Investigative Reporters and Editors, and the Mongabay Special Reporting Initiative.

Brendan Borrell on KCRW

Vaccines commonly contain adjuvants — substances that help fire up people’s immune systems.

COVID vaccine: Can immunity-boosting compounds from a Chilean tree help?

Vaccines commonly contain adjuvants — substances that help fire up people’s immune systems.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Meteorites can be quite valuable – hot commodities. Where there’s a commodity, there’s a trade and someone trying to get in on the action.

Hunting meteorites lands a man in prison

Meteorites can be quite valuable – hot commodities. Where there’s a commodity, there’s a trade and someone trying to get in on the action.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Weighing in at a staggering 840 pounds, the Brazilian Bahia Emerald is thought to be the biggest uncut emerald in the world.

An Epic Emerald Fight

Weighing in at a staggering 840 pounds, the Brazilian Bahia Emerald is thought to be the biggest uncut emerald in the world.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

More from KCRW

Some activists want Orange County officials to call for a ceasefire between Israel and Hamas, while others say it’s a foreign problem and shouldn’t be handled locally.

from KCRW Features

This week, Iza Kavedžija, a cultural anthropologist who lived in the Kansai region of Japan, while researching the older members of Japanese society, talks about how Japanese culture…

from Life Examined

It is hard to avoid superstitions, but they are usually harmless and can provide a boost of confidence

from Second Opinion

This week, Anna Lembke, addiction specialist at Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic , and author of “ Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence ,”…

from Life Examined

The condition is difficult to diagnose, and errors drive toward overdiagnosis.

from Second Opinion

Erewhon sells an $18 dollar smoothie named after Hailey Bieber. Mary Beth Albright considers how drinking it will make us feel.

from Good Food

Poet and author Christian Wiman talks about his cancer diagnosis, confronting death, and how his faith has taught him to embrace the unknown.

from Life Examined

Los Angeles Times columnist Todd Martens and author Matthew Fray open up about their painful journeys through heartbreak and divorce and offer insights into personal growth and what it…

from Life Examined

The Supreme Court will decide whether Donald Trump will appear on this year’s ballot. Will President Biden’s message on democracy capture voters’ attention?

from Left, Right & Center