Trita Parsi

National Iranian American Council

Guest

Trita Parsi is founder and President of the National Iranian American Council. He is the author of several books, including Treacherous Alliance: The Secret Dealings of Israel, Iran and the United States, for which he was Silver Medal winner of the 2008 Arthur Ross Book Award, given by the Council on Foreign Relations, A Single Roll of the Dice: Obama's Diplomacy with Iran, and Losing an Enemy: Obama, Iran and the Triumph of Diplomacy. He has also served as an adjunct professor of International Relations at Johns Hopkins University.

Trita Parsi on KCRW

President Trump tells the world America is open for business while dealing with a big story at home.

The Dealmaker At Davos

President Trump tells the world America is open for business while dealing with a big story at home.

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President Trump says the Iran nuclear deal is one of the worst deals he’s ever seen. In his speech tomorrow at the United Nations, he’s expected to attack both Iran and North Korea.

Will President Trump scrap the Iran nuclear deal?

President Trump says the Iran nuclear deal is one of the worst deals he’s ever seen. In his speech tomorrow at the United Nations, he’s expected to attack both Iran and North Korea.

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Responding to his first challenge from the world's most volatile region, President Trump has invoked economic sanctions against Iran.

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Responding to his first challenge from the world's most volatile region, President Trump has invoked economic sanctions against Iran.

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