ON AIR STAR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

Police Commissioner Robert Saltzman, for years the most critical voice on the civilian panel overseeing the LAPD, has ended his term. Saltzman tells Press Play about leaving at a heated time for LAPD, and amid a national debate over race and policing. And, Facebook once again found itself part of the news when it deactivated the accounts of a young woman who was live-streaming her stand-off with police before she was killed. Then, when Rio made its bid for this summer’s Olympic Games, the Olympic Committee promised to clean up Guanabara Bay, where Olympic sailors and open water swimmers will compete. It turns out, it was an empty promise. Also, Hillary Clinton may be close to breaking the greatest glass ceiling – the presidency; but dozens of women ran for president before her. A book titled “The Highest Glass Ceiling” profiles three remarkable women who made it closer than most. And finally, imagining more user-friendly food labels that would help make people more health conscious.

Producers:
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Jolie Myers
Christian Bordal
Sarah Sweeney

Commissioner Saltzman on stepping down at a heated time for LAPD 9 MIN, 8 SEC

Police Commissioner Robert Saltzman, for years the most critical voice on the civilian panel overseeing the LAPD, has ended his term. For almost a decade Saltzman fought to make the Los Angeles police more transparent, and improve its relationships with black, Latino and gay citizens. He leaves at a heated time, when the LAPD is under fire from activists protesting officer-involved shootings of black residents, and amid a national debate over race and policing.

Guests:
Robert Saltzman, LAPD, University of Southern California

More:
Robert M. Saltzman Commissioner Los Angeles Police Commission

Weekly web roundup: Facebook in the news 8 MIN, 29 SEC

Facebook, a news source for many, once again finds itself as part of the news this week. First, Facebook deactivated the accounts of a young woman who was live-streaming her stand-off with police. She was later killed. In less serious social media news, Instagram, which is owned by Facebook, has added Snapchat-like features. You can now post pictures and they’ll disappear after 24 hours. And finally, Facebook has expanded its war on clickbait headlines. It’s our regular weekly web roundup with Xeni Jardin.

Guests:
Xeni Jardin, BoingBoing.net (@xeni)

More:
BoingBoing

Olympic games begin, but Rio’s bay still filled with sewage 10 MIN, 9 SEC

Rivers that traverse in and around Rio de Janeiro pour the sewage and trash of millions into Guanabara Bay where Olympic sailors will compete in this summer’s Olympic Games. Nearby famous Copacabana Beach, at the lip of the bay, will host the open water swimming and triathlon competitions. When Rio made its bid for the games, the Olympic Committee promised to clean up Guanabara Bay. So far, it’s an empty promise.


Guests:
John Branch, New York Times

More:
Who Is Polluting Rio’s Bay?

Before Clinton, efforts to shatter the 'Highest Glass Ceiling' 14 MIN, 37 SEC

Hillary Clinton won’t be the last woman to run for president, and she’s not the first – she’s not even the tenth or the hundredth. Most women who ran for president never had a chance, but a handful made it further than the rest and paved the way for Clinton. Three of them – Victoria Woodhull, Margaret Chase Smith, and Shirley Chisholm – are profiled in a new book titled The Highest Glass Ceiling: Women's Quest for the American Presidency, written by University of New Hampshire historian Ellen Fitzpatrick.

Guests:
Ellen Fitzpatrick, professor and historian (@EllenFitzP)

The Highest Glass Ceiling

Ellen Fitzpatrick

Reimagining food labels 5 MIN, 30 SEC

If you think you’re eating healthy by consulting food labels, you may be very mistaken. Wired Magazine’s current food issue serves up a redefined approach to labeling that, according to Wired, makes understanding ingredients and nutritional information a lot easier to swallow. What’s wrong with the FDA’s current structure? And would more user-friendly labels make people more health conscious?


Guests:
Jennifer Chaussee, Wired

More:
We Redesigned Food Labels to Serve Up Real Value

Upcoming

View Schedule

New Episodes

Events

View All Events

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED