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Photo courtesy of Steve Johnson.

Some LA neighborhoods face higher lead levels than Flint 10 MIN, 36 SEC

It’s been three years since the lead crisis in Flint, Michigan began. They’re still drinking bottled water there. In LA County, there are places with even higher rates of lead contamination, and in areas you wouldn’t expect, like wealthy San Marino.

Guests:
Michael Pell, Reuters (@Reuters)
Richard Sun, Mayor of San Marino (@RichardSunDDS)

More:
Across Los Angeles, toxic lead harms children in neighborhoods rich and poor

Silver Lake Reservoir gets filled, but not everyone is celebrating 9 MIN, 10 SEC

In the last couple of years, the Silver Lake Reservoir was a large, empty concrete hole. But as record snowpack levels in the Sierra are starting to melt, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power is turning on the valves to start refilling the reservoir ahead of schedule.

Guests:
Alissa Walker, Curbed (@awalkerinLA)

More:
The Silver Lake drought is over: Reservoir will be finally refilled

Facing $20 billion debt, could iHeartRadio go bankrupt? 8 MIN, 11 SEC

iHeartRadio is a commercial radio juggernaut. It airs Ryan Seacrest and Rush Limbaugh, owns billboards and hundreds of radio stations. Now it’s facing serious financial problems.

Guests:
Gene Maddaus, Variety (@GeneMaddaus)

How one human gene could lead to the end of pain 14 MIN, 49 SEC

Steven Pete has never felt pain, not even when he broke more than 70 bones in his body. Pam Costa feels pain constantly, even wearing clothes hurts. She has a rare condition that makes her skin feel like it’s always on fire. Pete and Costa both live in Washington State and are helping scientists identify a cure for pain without using opiates.

Guests:
Erika Hayasaki, Wired (@ErikaHayasaki)
Stephen Waxman, Yale Medical School; Veterans Affairs Connecticut

More:
HOW A SINGLE GENE COULD BECOME A VOLUME KNOB FOR HUMAN SUFFERING

Heritage grains make a comeback in California 7 MIN, 17 SEC

Heritage grains are the ancient, unadulterated varieties of crops like wheat, barley and rice. More farms are growing them now because they have stronger flavors and they’re drought tolerant. Many LA restaurants have been eager to incorporate them into some of their dishes.

Guests:
Katherine Spiers, LA Weekly; Producer of Smarth Mouth (@katherinespiers)

More:
Heritage Grains Are Infiltrating L.A.’s Dining Scene — and Maybe Your Kitchen

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