ON AIR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

Cassini's voyage ends in blaze of glory 6 MIN, 31 SEC

The Spacecraft Cassini burned up in Saturn's atmosphere this morning. That's according to Earth time. Cassini was launched in 1997, reached Saturn in 2004 and lasted 10 years longer than anybody expected. Project Manager Earl Maize delivered the obituary at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California. "This has been an incredible mission, an incredible spacecraft, and you're all an incredible team. I'm going to call this the end of mission. Project Manager off the net."

NPR's Science Correspondent Joe Palca was at JPL as Cassini's mission ended.

Photo: NASA/Joel Kowsky

Guests:
Joe Palca, NPR (@joesbigidea)

Disasters don't discriminate but relief efforts do 32 MIN, 10 SEC

Congress is spending many billions of dollars to clean up after Harvey and Irma. Survivors will be lucky if the money lasts more than a month. That's according to a former head of FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency. We survey the damage in the US Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico and Florida. We find out what federal and local officials can learn from Cuba. And we hear how Houston exemplifies the disproportionate impacts of natural disasters on poor and minority neighborhoods.

Guests:
Jordyn Holman, Bloomberg (@JordynJournals)
Luis Ferré-Sadurní, New York Times (@luisferre)
Elizabeth Newhouse, Center for International Policy (@ciponline)
Marc Caputo, Politico (@MarcACaputo)
Robert Bullard, Texas Southern University (@DrBobBullard)

More:
Holman on Irma leaving Virgin Islanders torn between fight and flight
Ferré-Sadurní on Irma laying bare Puerto Rico's infrastructure problem
Newhouse on why Cubans are less likely to die from hurricanes than Americans
Caputo on Irma's wrath leaving Florida Keys reeling with onerous recovery ahead

Invisible Houston

Robert D. Bullard

Is there a way to fight Big Tech's power? (Part II) 10 MIN, 51 SEC

In World without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech, Franklin Foer makes the case that for far too long we've marveled at the products of Silicon Valley without seeing the existential threat they pose as monopolies -- because they are not like other monopolies. For instance, Exxon sells gas and McDonald's sells hamburgers, but what do Google and its parent company Alphabet actually sell? What is it exactly that they are monopolizing?  (Listen to Part I.)

Guests:
Franklin Foer, Atlantic (@FranklinFoer)

World Without Mind

Franklin Foer

Subscribe to the 5 Things To Do newsletter

Never miss the best of what to do with your free time.

 

More From To the Point

LATEST BLOG POSTS

Events

View All Events

New Episodes

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED