ON AIR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

Photo: Protesters at Los Angeles International Airport react to President Trump's latest executive order, January 29, 2017. (Evan George)

Administration defends travel ban, despite havoc 39 MIN, 37 SEC

President Trump's sweeping executive order banning refugees and barring immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries is just three days old, but has already upended hundreds of lives, drawn tens of thousands of protesters to airports around the nation, and spawned five federal lawsuits, as well as global outcry from across the political spectrum. Why is a defining campaign promise causing such confusion? Is it constitutional? Guest host Barbara Bogaev explores the fallout from the President's travel ban.

Guests:
Hannah Allam, McClatchy Newspapers (@HannahAllam)
Jennifer Rubin, Washington Post (@JRubinBlogger)
Jessica Vaughan, Center for Immigration Studies (@JessicaV_CIS)
James Zogby, Arab-American Institute (@jjz1600)
Kirk Johnson, The List Project to Resettle Iraqi Allies (@KirkWJohnson)

More:
McCaskill on Democrats demanding meeting, answers from DHS chief
Civil Rights Litigation Clearinghouse
CAIR lawsuit challenging constitutionality of Trump's Muslim ban, executive order
Allam on Trump abandoning stand on green card holders in face of court challenges
Rubin on the 'staggering incompetence' of Trump's travel ban
Johnson on the Yazidi refugee stranded at the airport by Trump
NPR on 7 targeted countries' response to Trump's immigration ban

To Be a Friend Is Fatal

Kirk W. Johnson

In US-Mexico crisis, there's blame on both sides of the border 10 MIN, 3 SEC

TALKING POINT
The President of Mexico will not be at the White House this week as planned. It's a result of the Trump Administration's first foreign policy fight with an ally and trading partner. All the talk of building a wall and a border tax to pay for it was too much political pressure for President Enrique Peña Nieto to tolerate.


Then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Mexico's President Enrique Peña Nieto arrive for a press conference at the Los Pinos residence in Mexico City, August 31, 2016.
Photo by Henry Romero/Reuters

But if this standoff gives the impression that Trump and Peña Nieto are polar opposites, that's not the case. The two men are more alike than they may seem, according to John Ackerman, a professor at the Institute for Legal Research at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, also newspaper columnist and editor-in-chief of the Mexican Law Review.

Guests:
John Ackerman, National Autonomous University of Mexico (@JohnMAckerman)

Subscribe to the 5 Things To Do newsletter

Never miss the best of what to do with your free time.

 

More From To the Point

LATEST BLOG POSTS

Events

View All Events

New Episodes

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED