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FROM THIS EPISODE

Britain's new Prime Minister met with President Bush today at Camp David. What's the latest on the "special relationship?" How different is Brown from Tony Blair when it comes to Iraq and the "war on terror?" Plus, the Taliban extends the deadline for South Korean hostages and, on Reporter's Notebook, in the battle against Multiple Sclerosis, researchers claim the first big step in 30 years.


White House photo by Eric Draper

Producers:
Andrea Brody
Vanessa Romo
Dan Konecky

Making News Taliban Extends Deadline for South Korean Hostages 6 MIN

Several news agencies are quoting Taliban sources who are saying they have shot to death another kidnapped South Korean. A South Korean envoy is headed for Afghanistan in the hopes of rescuing the rest. Most of the hostages are women. There are 21 or 22 remaining in custody. Griff Whitte is in Islamabad, covering Afghanistan and Pakistan for the Washington Post.

Guests:
Griff Witte, Washington Post (@griffwitte)

Main Topic What's Next for the 'Special Relationship?' 36 MIN, 14 SEC

Britain's new Prime Minister Gordon Brown has been portrayed as a big change from Tony Blair, especially on Iraq and the war on terror. But today at Camp David, Brown and President Bush filled the air with compliments. Each called the other his country's most important ally. We hear their public comments about the "historic partnership," and look at what their real differences might be. Can Brown get his troops out of Iraq soon enough to suit British voters?  Has he softened his rhetoric to appeal to a Muslim constituency threatened by terms like "war on terror?"

Guests:
Mark Silva, White House Correspondent, Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune
Gerald Howarth, British Shadow Defense Minister
Mary Dejevsky, The Independent
Azzam Tamini, Director of the Institute of Islamic Thought
Christopher Hitchens, late author and journalist (@christopherhitc)

Reporter's Notebook Breakthrough Discovery in Battle against Multiple Sclerosis 6 MIN, 21 SEC

Multiple Sclerosis is a neurological disease that causes symptoms ranging from muscle weakness to paralysis. Its causes are environmental as well as genetic. Thirty years ago, researchers found one gene that's part of the problem. Now medical researchers say they've found a second gene.  Margaret Pericak-Vance, director of the Miami Institute for Human Genomics, co-authored two papers on MS published today.

Guests:
Margaret Pericak-Vance, Director of the Miami Institute for Human Genomics at the University of Miami

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