ON AIR STAR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

As soldiers took over for riot police, tanks rolled through the streets of Cairo and Alexandria tonight. Tens of thousands of protesters were demanding the removal of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak. Also, 25 years after the Challenger disaster, what's the future of NASA?

Banner image: Egyptian demonstrators shout slogans next to burning police vehicles in Cairo on January 28, 2011. Photo: Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images

Ruling But Not Governing

Steven A. Cook

Producers:
Frances Anderton
Christian Bordal
Gary Scott
Karen Radziner

Making News US Treads a Delicate Line Reacting to Events in Egypt 7 MIN, 47 SEC

As soldiers took over for riot police, tanks rolled through the streets of Cairo and Alexandria tonight.  Tens of thousands of protesters were demanding the removal of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak. In Washington, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said the US has repeatedly supported the human rights of the Egyptian people. Clinton also called on protesters to refrain from violence.  Mark Landler is Diplomatic Correspondent for the New York Times.

Guests:
Mark Landler, New York Times (@MarkLandler)

Main Topic History in the Making on the Streets of Egypt 35 MIN, 58 SEC

In Egypt tonight, tens of thousands of protesters defied both tear gas and an official curfew imposed in Alexandria, Suez, Cairo and other parts of the country. In Cairo and Alexandria, the Army was deployed and embraced by demonstrators after brutal violence by the riot police. The government has shut down most lines of communication with the rest of the world. Well into the evening, President Hosni Mubarak, the Army's Commander in Chief, had yet to be heard from. There were reports that his family had left the country. Can his 30-year-old administration survive tonight's unprecedented uprising? What about the rest of the Middle East? What does the Obama Administration have to say? 

Guests:
Ellen Knickmeyer, Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting
Mona Eltahawy, syndicated columnist (@monaeltahawy )
Steven Cook, Council on Foreign Relations (@stevenacook)
Mariam Memarsadeghi, Tavaana E-learning Institute for Iranian Civil Society

Reporter's Notebook Challenger Disaster and Its Impact on the Space Program 7 MIN, 13 SEC

NASA was created to run America's race into space after the Soviet Union launched the orbiting satellite Sputnik in 1958. Twenty-five years ago, the Challenger spacecraft exploded 73 seconds after launch. Six astronauts and school teacher Christa McAuliffe lost their lives. What's happened to NASA and America's competition with other nations in space? Joan Johnson-Freese, author of Heavenly Ambitions: America's Quest to Dominate Space, is Professor of National Security Studies at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island.

Guests:
Joan Johnson-Freese, Chair of National Security Studies, Naval War College

Heavenly Ambitions

Joan Johnson-Freese

Events

View All Events

New Episodes

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED