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FROM THIS EPISODE

North Korea has defied the UN Security Council and tested a nuclear weapon. Iran may not be far behind. What’s happened to the nuclear non-proliferation regime?  Is it still possible to stop the spread of the atom bomb?  Also, calculating the civilian death toll from the war in Iraq.

Producers:
Christian Bordal
Katie Cooper
Karen Radziner

Reporter's Notebook Study Claims Iraq's "Excess" Death Toll at 655,000 5 MIN, 23 SEC

American and Iraqi health officials released a report today saying 655,000 Iraqis have died because of the US invasion in 2003.  That's 20 times what the President said last December. The highest estimate ever for the toll of the war in Iraq comes from the Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health. It says the total is 655,000 Iraqi civilians dead, which translates to 15,000 a month, a figure President Bush does not find credible.

Guests:
William Arkin, Online Columnist, Washington Post

Main Topic The Future of Non-Proliferation 37 MIN, 46 SEC

Although the US has no intention of attacking North Korea, President Bush reiterated today that the US won't tolerate that country's nuclear weapon. The President emphasized diplomacy in the aftermath of Korea's nuclear test this weekend, adding that Japan, South Korea, China and Russia all have agreed that multi-national diplomacy is the way to go. With Iran allegedly on its way to building a bomb, what's happened to the international non-proliferation regime? Why have some countries turned away from nuclear weapons while others go full-speed ahead?  Is aid with nuclear power an invitation to building a bomb?

Guests:
Robert Gallucci, Dean of the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University
Henry Sokolski, former Deputy for Nonproliferation Policy, Defense Department
Michael Levi, Council on Foreign Relations (@levi_m)
Rose Gottemoeller, Director of Carnegie Moscow Center

Making News President Bush Maintains Tough Line on North Korea 5 MIN, 57 SEC

After the nuclear test on Sunday, President Bush says North Korea must "dismantle" weapons production, and that Japan, South Korea, China and Russia are part of a unified diplomatic effort. Speaking today at the White House, in referring to previous criticism over his administration's unilateral and often rigid approach to foreign policy, the President emphasized his flexibility in responding to new circumstances, although he did not elaborate.

Guests:
Richard Wolffe, Correspondent, MSNBC

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