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Photo: Myanmar State Counselor Aung San Suu Kyi delivers a speech to the nation over Rakhine and Rohingya situation, in Naypyitaw, Myanmar September 19, 2017. (Soe Zeya Tun/Reuters)

Puerto Rico grapples with hurricane damage 6 MIN, 9 SEC

The scope of destruction left by Hurricane Maria is still unknown in Puerto. Residents and government officials have just started surveying the damage. William Villafañe, Chief of Staff of the territorial government, told NPR that he’d never in his life seen anything like it. David Ovalle is covering from Miami while colleagues from the Miami Herald find what they can in Puerto Rico.

Guests:
David Ovalle, Miami Herald (@DavidOvalle305)

The Nobel Peace Prize and ethnic cleansing 32 MIN, 14 SEC

When Aung San Suu Kyi was a prisoner of the ruling military in Myanmar, she won international sympathy -- and the Nobel Peace Prize. The dictatorship felt enough international pressure to allow for elections, and she was chosen for leadership, but with limited power. Now she is failing to speak out against brutal military repression of the Rohingya minority in her Buddhist-majority country. Many former supporters are crying "shame." But others say she has little choice as a virtual prisoner in a fledgling democracy.

Guests:
Matt Spetalnick, White House Correspondent, Reuters News Service (@mattspetalnick)
Nicholas Kristof, New York Times (@NickKristof)
Sarah Margon, Human Rights Watch
Azeem Ibrahim, Center for Global Policy (@AzeemIbrahim)

More:
Spetalnick on Trump urging 'strong and swift' UN action to end Rohingya crisis
Kristof on Nobel Peace Prize-winner Aung San Suu Kyi's shame
Margon calls on Suu Kyi to focus on ending Burma's civil war
Ibrahim on Suu Kyi choosing politics over human dignity
Ibrahim on how we were seduced by Suu Kyi
Asia Society's Kevin Rudd on Myanmar's Rohingya crisis and reality

The Rohingyas

Azeem Ibrahim

This Alabama Runoff Couldn't Get Any Moore Strange 10 MIN, 45 SEC


(L-R) Luther Strange and Roy Moore

Republicans in Alabama are focused on the US Senate primary for a nominee to replace Jeff Sessions, who was appointed Attorney General by President Trump. President Trump is taking sides and he's going to Alabama to endorse Luther Strange and campaign against former judge Roy Moore. Pat Duggins, news director for Alabama Public Radio, says the face-off is a referendum on Conservatism.

Guests:
Pat Duggins, Alabama Public Radio (@PatDuggins)

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