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FROM THIS EPISODE

WikiLeaks is said to be starting an age of "involuntary transparency." But as governments and businesses struggle to beef up cyber-security, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange says they’re not dealing with hackers but leakers.  Also, the White House’s debt commission releases “The Moment of Truth,” and the FDA gets new powers to protect food safety.

Banner image: US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton answers a question about the release by WikiLeaks of confidential US documents, during a press briefing at the State Department in Washington, DC, on November 29, 2010. Photo: Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Making News White House Debt Commission Releases 'The Moment of Truth' 7 MIN, 37 SEC

The co-chairs say it's the the "Moment of Truth," and it calls for sweeping changes in how the federal government collects and spends taxpayers' money. It's the report of the President's Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform. Damian Paletta reports for the Wall Street Journal.

Guests:
Damian Paletta, Wall Street Journal (@damianpaletta)

Main Topic Can Anyone Keep a Secret Any More? 35 MIN, 9 SEC

WikiLeaks' latest "mega-dump" of information has caused distress and embarrassment worldwide, especially at the US State Department where Secretary of State Clinton says they "allegedly" originated. Publication in five newspapers around the world has only begun, and staffs of reporters and checkers have been assigned to determine what's real and what's not. After shaking up international diplomacy, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange says upcoming revelations might bring down a major American bank. Can Assange be stopped? Is WikiLeaks destroying the trust crucial to US diplomacy, or do documents leaked so far show State Department officials just doing their jobs? What about Hillary Clinton ordering diplomats to spy on their counterparts? Has WikiLeaks uncovered an unsavory kind of business as usual?

 

Guests:
Gregor Peter Schmitz, Washington Correspondent, Der Spiegel
Dave Clemente, Cyber Security Analyst, Chatham House
Andy Greenberg, Forbes magazine (@a_greenberg)
David Corn, Mother Jones magazine (@DavidCornDC)
Marc Ambinder, The Week (@marcambinder)

Hubris

David Corn and Michael Isikoff

Reporter's Notebook Food Safety Bill Makes It through the Senate 7 MIN, 56 SEC

Recent outbreaks of food poisoning from eggs, peanuts and spinach have killed more than a dozen people and sickened thousands more. Last year, the House voted vast new power for the Food and Drug Administration and yesterday the Senate followed suit, on a vote of 73 to 25, approving the biggest overhaul to FDA laws since the 1930's. What caused an unusual spasm of bipartisanship? What new powers will the agency have? Lyndsey Layton covers food safety for the Washington Post.

Guests:
Lyndsey Layton, Washington Post (@LyndseyLayton)

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