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Michael Hanline set a record yesterday when he was released in Ventura after 36 years in state prison.  That’s the longest anyone has served in California for a wrongful conviction. We hear why he’s still not entirely free, and talk with a Bakersfield bus driver who spent 20 years behind bars for a murder he did not commit. Also, Sacramento and Washington plan wind farms and giant solar arrays on some two million acres of Southern California.  That’s pitting progressive energy goals against people who live in the desert.

Photo: Michael Hanline (L) with attorney Alex Simpson (California Innocence Project)

Producers:
Benjamin Gottlieb
Sasa Woodruff

Angelenos React to the Ferguson Grand Jury Decision 7 MIN, 6 SEC

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck says the trouble in Ferguson reminded him of rioting in Los Angeles in 1992, when four officers were acquitted in the beating of Rodney King.  But nothing comparable took place.  In Beverly Hills, protesters shut down an intersection of Rodeo Drive; near Leimert Park, several streets were shut down, and about 150 demonstrators found their way onto the 110 Freeway.  Jasmyne Cannick, a local commentator on politics and society, went along.

Guests:
Jasmyne Cannick, social and political commentator (@jasmyne)

State’s Longest Serving Wrongfully Convicted Inmate Is Free 11 MIN, 27 SEC

Ventura County’s District Attorney says he’s “no longer comfortable” with the murder conviction of Michael Hanline. In 1980, Hanline was sentenced to life without the possibility of parole. When he was released yesterday in Ventura, Hanline set a record for serving longer than any other Californian to be wrongfully convicted: 36 years.

Guests:
Alex Simpson, California Innocence Project (@CA_Innocence)
Timothy Atkins, wrongly convicted, exonerated for murder

In the Desert, 'Clean Energy' Is a Dirty Word 9 MIN, 7 SEC

The Obama Administration and the State of California have ambitious goals for developing renewable energy, and they’re making a 25-year master plan for 22 million acres of desert lands. Two million could provide for massive wind and solar farms. KCRW’s Evan George reports that’s pitting a progressive agenda against people who live there.

You can see pictures showing the impact of solar plants on the desert on our Which Way, LA blog .

Guests:
Evan George, Managing Producer, 'To the Point' (@evanlgeorge)

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