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FROM THIS EPISODE

Los Angeles faces a shortage of affordable housing, and not enough is being constructed to meet increasing demand.  That’s created a problem with “workforce housing”—which allows people to live close to their jobs.  It all adds up to a real threat to economic recovery.   

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Evan George
Sonya Geis

Making News Flu Vaccine in Los Angeles

Guests:
Jonathan Fielding, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health

Banter Will a New Mayor Address the Housing Affordability Gap?

Los Angeles faces a shortage of affordable housing, and not enough is being constructed to meet increasing demand.  That’s created a problem with “workforce housing”—which allows people to live close to their jobs.  It all adds up to a real threat to economic recovery.

A recent study shows that the average rent for a 2 bedroom apartment in LA County is almost 1800 dollars—300 dollars more than the median household can afford.  With the average cost of a house still 335,000, many families are still priced out of the market.  Comparisons with other cities show that’s preventing economic recovery and driving some businesses out of town.    But that’s not the only problem.  When people can’t live close enough to their jobs, they’re driven to desperate solutions.

Candidates for Mayor claim they’re up on the problem, but how would they solve it?  Could changing Proposition 13 be part of the answer?

Guests:
Tony Salazar, President of for-profit developer McCormack Baron Salazar (@SCANPH)
Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times (@MaeveReston)
Amy Freilich, LA-based land use attorney, she was involved with a study of the local housing affordability gap, commissioned last fall by the Los Angeles Business Council
Stuart Gabriel, UCLA's Ziman Center for Real Estate (@uclaanderson)

Main Topic The NFL and Brain Damage

Massive audiences are tuning into the NFL playoffs with the Superbowl just three weeks away. At the same time, new medical evidence suggests the repeated physical blows some fans may relish leave players with traumatic brain damage.

Expected Hall of Fame linebacker Junior Seau committed suicide last may at the age of 43. Postumous studies have made him the most high-profile NFL player so far to be diagnosed with Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy—or CTE… a finding that could lead to big changes in the NFL.

Guests:
Andrew Brandt, ESPN (@adbrandt)
Bob Stern, Professor of Neurology and Neurosurgery at Boston University, and co-founder of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy
Will Leitch, New York Magazine (@williamfleitch)
Daniel Engber, Science writer and columnist for SLATE (@danengber)

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