Robert Dion

Professor of Political Science, Evansville University

Guest

Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Evansville in southern Indiana

Robert Dion on KCRW

Over the weekend,  Barack Obama  won Guam's Democratic delegates by seven points, but it's been weeks since he posted a big victory.

Tar Heels and Hoosiers Head to the Polls

Over the weekend, Barack Obama won Guam's Democratic delegates by seven points, but it's been weeks since he posted a big victory.

from To the Point

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